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Aromaticity

This diagram is known as a "Frost Circle", and shows the energy levels of the molecular orbitals of the pi system in a benzene molecule. I like the way it is nested - at each corner of the diagram we see a visualization of one of the molecular orbitals of the benzene molecule. Taken as a whole, the diagram also constitutes a common shorthand representation of benzene - a hexagon with a circle in the center.

The ouroboros in the center is a reference to the great German chemist Kekule, who is most famous for deducing the (approximate) structure of benzene. The structure came to him after having a reverie of a snake seizing his own tail. Kekule died several years before the Nobel prize was instituted, but would sure have received a Nobel prize had he survived longer. Three of the first five Nobel prizes in Chemistry went to a student of his.



I think this makes a cool design for a shirt. I think of it as the sort of geometric pattern a superhero might use as an emblem on his (or her) chest. A chemist superhero. There ought to be more of these. Perhaps the reason we haven't seen many of them yet is a shortage of good logos.

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NoBeardPete

This diagram is known as a "Frost Circle", and shows the energy levels of the molecular orbitals of the pi system in a benzene molecule. I like the way it is nested - at each corner of the diagram we see a visualization of one of the molecular orbitals of the benzene molecule. Taken as a whole, the diagram also constitutes a common shorthand representation of benzene - a hexagon with a circle in the center.
The ouroboros in the center is a reference to the great German chemist Kekule, who is most famous for deducing the (approximate) structure of benzene. The structure came to him after having a reverie of a snake seizing his own tail. Kekule died several years before the Nobel prize was instituted, but would sure have received a Nobel prize had he survived longer. Three of the first five Nobel prizes in Chemistry went to a student of his.

I think this makes a cool design for a shirt. I think of it as the sort of geometric pattern a superhero might use as an emblem on his (or her) chest. A chemist superhero. There ought to be more of these. Perhaps the reason we haven't seen many of them yet is a shortage of good logos.

NoBeardPete

This diagram is known as a "Frost Circle", and shows the energy levels of the molecular orbitals of the pi system in a benzene molecule. I like the way it is nested - at each corner of the diagram we see a visualization of one of the molecular orbitals of the benzene molecule. Taken as a whole, the diagram also constitutes a common shorthand representation of benzene - a hexagon with a circle in the center.

The ouroboros in the center is a reference to the great German chemist Kekule, who is most famous for deducing the (approximate) structure of benzene. The structure came to him after having a reverie of a snake seizing his own tail. Kekule died several years before the Nobel prize was instituted, but would sure have received a Nobel prize had he survived longer. Three of the first five Nobel prizes in Chemistry went to a student of his.



I think this makes a cool design for a shirt. I think of it as the sort of geometric pattern a superhero might use as an emblem on his (or her) chest. A chemist superhero. There ought to be more of these. Perhaps the reason we haven't seen many of them yet is a shortage of good logos.

NoBeardPete

I've fiddled with the colors and made some of the lines stronger to try to make it pop out a bit more. I'm a big science nerd, and think a design based on the Frost Circle would be pretty damned cool, but am not really experienced with graphic design. I'd love any more advice any of y'all have.

Wynsickle

My friend would love this. I don't really see anything that needs to be improved.

Perhaps you could add some more detail to the serpent, but I feel that you were aiming for simplicity.

Andrew Geddes

You could maybe make the text a little larger to make it easier to read at a distance.

Other than that it's fine :)

3Bee

I agree I missed the snake completely at first.

This is well designed. Well out of my range of chemical experience and I don't know how big the market is for Hyper Science T-Shirts but, obviously it's big enough or we wouldn't have ThinkGeek or XKCD.

I'm the sort of person that loves things rooted in reality but would like them incorporated into a design where they're barely recognizable building blocks to a larger image or design, as in composited, abstracted, wrapping around the t, etc. That's a completely different look than you're going for, I'm just vouching it as my personal preference, so its hard for me to evaluate this other than to say "Yes! It is clean and the colors are nice." If you're achieving your goal make the little tweaks and submit it. Good luck!

overmind

nice... but try to add more element such a matematical syntax or something else so it will look better...

NoBeardPete

This diagram is known as a "Frost Circle", and shows the energy levels of the molecular orbitals of the pi system in a benzene molecule. I like the way it is nested - at each corner of the diagram we see a visualization of one of the molecular orbitals of the benzene molecule. Taken as a whole, the diagram also constitutes a common shorthand representation of benzene - a hexagon with a circle in the center.

The ouroboros in the center is a reference to the great German chemist Kekule, who is most famous for deducing the (approximate) structure of benzene. The structure came to him after having a reverie of a snake seizing his own tail. Kekule died several years before the Nobel prize was instituted, but would sure have received a Nobel prize had he survived longer. Three of the first five Nobel prizes in Chemistry went to a student of his.



I think this makes a cool design for a shirt. I think of it as the sort of geometric pattern a superhero might use as an emblem on his (or her) chest. A chemist superhero. There ought to be more of these. Perhaps the reason we haven't seen many of them yet is a shortage of good logos.

NoBeardPete

Ok, no real change to the t-shirt itself, but I've spiffed up the submission with a picture off the front of an old chemistry set of my dad's. I'm also including an option for the shirt being in red. I'll probably submit this in a few days unless I get any specific advice. Please let me know what y'all think!

NoBeardPete

This diagram is known as a "Frost Circle", and shows the energy levels of the molecular orbitals of the pi system in a benzene molecule. I like the way it is nested - at each corner of the diagram we see a visualization of one of the molecular orbitals of the benzene molecule. Taken as a whole, the diagram also constitutes a common shorthand representation of benzene - a hexagon with a circle in the center.

The ouroboros in the center is a reference to the great German chemist Kekule, who is most famous for deducing the (approximate) structure of benzene. The structure came to him after having a reverie of a snake seizing his own tail. Kekule died several years before the Nobel prize was instituted, but would sure have received a Nobel prize had he survived longer. Three of the first five Nobel prizes in Chemistry went to a student of his.



I think this makes a cool design for a shirt. I think of it as the sort of geometric pattern a superhero might use as an emblem on his (or her) chest. A chemist superhero. There ought to be more of these. Perhaps the reason we haven't seen many of them yet is a shortage of good logos.

NoBeardPete

I've made a few minor changes. I've removed some of the text labels to focus on the central design itself. The electron arrows are now centered on the orbital lines according to the standard convention. I've also shrunk the design on the shirt so that it doesn't take up so much space. I'm aiming for the rough size of, say, Superman's S or Batman's bat symbol.

I'm especially looking for some advice from more experienced Threadless folks at this point. The boy is wearing the blue shirt from the threadless template, but with the sleeves because of the way he's holding his arms. Is that kosher? Also, I'm using this photo of a chemistry set from I think the mid-fourties for the boy and the table/chemistry supplies. These elements don't go on the shirt. Is that ok?

Leo Canham
Leo Canham profile pic Alumni

The template is just to show Threadless where the design would be printed on a t shirt. Other imagery accompanying the design is also acceptable. Good luck with the design.The chemistry symbols are beyond me but it looks great. I say submit it!

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