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Why does it not pay your bills?

As probably most of you on here, I dream of one day paying (most of) my bills with what I love.
I am aware, that my output rate and quality is nowhere near, where it needs to be, in order to stand a chance right now.
However, I wonder, as I read in the blogs, why even the most talented and succesful among you are not able to quit their dayjobs and live off of the money your illustrations make.


I mean, I am amazed by the talent some people on here do have and the following and sales that brings, but at the same time it does not seem to be enough. If I'd sell as many designs as some of y'all seem to do on PoD sites/threadless/younameit, I'd probably be well off and would stop my (currently not existing) job and put my all into designing...


I get excited when I make 10$/month off of reddbubble etc...not complaining - just not understanding.

Watch this
MudgeStudios
MudgeStudios profile pic Alumni

The cost of living is just so high. Not to mention the tax rate for being self-employed is higher.

gasponce

I agree 100%! My guess is this kind of level and skill took some backing up, meaning a few extra 000 added to the bills we're talking about, like loans etc!? Just a guess! But I too would love to hear from the succesfull peeps here!!!

gasponce

oops! that was meant to be the first comment! My agreeing is with sausage_moe!

celandinestern
celandinestern profile pic Alumni

there's a lot of different factors. PoD's require patience and perseverance, you need to keep putting in new stuff and growing your fanbase. For yearrrrrs. I'm up to about 1000 fans on S6 after about a year of effort and still my best month on there was 70$ - and the one after that was 25$. Every new site requires a ton of time for you to get all the formats right, get everything uploaded, promote it somewhere, times dozens of sites times dozens of pieces of artwork. It's exhausting.

Freelancing is great if you have a steady stream of clients, but that takes a lot of working up to. Then projects last different amounts of time and waiting for payments takes different amounts of time. A lot of people don't believe in paying for art, at least not paying reasonable prices.

Also there is a crapton of super talented people out there. Tough to make your mark and convince clients that you're the absolute best for their project.

lxromero
lxromero profile pic Staff
9 designs submitted - Score now!

the design market is a bit saturated, getting traction is not as easy as some of us might wish. That being said, there are a ton of us doing what we love and making a living out of it which is really cool

JaymeArt
lxromero said:

the design market is a bit saturated, getting traction is not as easy as some of us might wish. That being said, there are a ton of us doing what we love and making a living out of it which is really cool

thats encouraging :]

nickv47
nickv47 profile pic Alumni
lxromero said:

the design market is a bit saturated, getting traction is not as easy as some of us might wish. That being said, there are a ton of us doing what we love and making a living out of it which is really cool

agreed. and getting a bit oversaturated with new flavors of PoD sites popping up almost monthly, it's hard to break through it all.

while I'm employed as an artist, I'm doing "art" but it's not personal stuff, the personal stuff is what I do on my free time. so in other words, you might have to make the compromise of making professional and personal work to say afloat if you do go that route.

i would also suggest looking into creative staffing agencies in your area to get more clients, and also beefing up (or creating if you don't have one) a linkedin profile so you can be found.

lxromero
lxromero profile pic Staff
9 designs submitted - Score now!

I also have to say that unfortunately we do work in a field that has a bit of an inherent uphill battle. People like looking at art and admiring it but not everybody likes buying it. When you think of client work sometimes there's also that notion that what you do shouldn't be as expensive as it is.

sausage_moe

wow. those are all really cool tips and great suggestions.

Maybe I didn't find the right words or asked the wrong questions, because even though these answers are all very helpful (as mentioned above) I was not really wondering how to do it (for once), but rather why it doesn't work, even though some of you are so talented and succesful...

Sounds like the same question, kinda... What I'm trying to say is: Do you guys live in fucking mansions? Because the money some of you guys must make on PoD stuff alone would be more than enough for my humble lifestyle ;)

Also, of course I don't expect doing only personal work and earn millions...I just want to find something more down my alley!

nickv47 said:

i would also suggest looking into creative staffing agencies in your area to get more clients, and also beefing up (or creating if you don't have one) a linkedin profile so you can be found.

just to understand correctly...like an agent? people you pay to get you jobs?

also...this is the first time in this area of jobs I've heard of linkedin being important...somehow it always seemed snobbish to me.

dsds

sausage_moe, I also tortured myself with quite a similar question - how to survive while doing what I want so I can be happy? :) I came to conclusions: one, I had to change my lifestyle and make do with the minimum of bare necessities. Second, I had to move to a country with lower living costs. Both points were quite helpful :D

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

You can do tee design anywhere in the world, but unless you live in a place that's comparatively cheap to live, you're going to have a hard time making a living off it. Someone in the phillipenes could very realistically make a very decent living just submitting to tee sites, whereas those of us in more developed countries have almost no hope. But the fact That anyone can make any money off it all shows just how far it has come as a business. Historically, artists have relied on patrons to survive, and commercial artists have never been paid well.

But now you got a situation where you've got a 100 million designers all trying to make money off their stuff, so it really becomes an issue of talent mixed with being in the right place at the right time.

FoodStampDavis
FoodStampDavis profile pic Alumni
lxromero said:

I also have to say that unfortunately we do work in a field that has a bit of an inherent uphill battle. People like looking at art and admiring it but not everybody likes buying it. When you think of client work sometimes there's also that notion that what you do shouldn't be as expensive as it is.

Yup.

Seems like everyone under the age of 30 calls him/herself a "designer" or "photographer." It's total saturation. There are far more people doing it and trying to do it than there is a market for it. You really gotta be a rockstar and then some to live off it. Couple all that with the fact desktop publishing has more and more people just doing certain jobs themselves, for better or worse.

FoodStampDavis
FoodStampDavis profile pic Alumni

The easiest way to do what you love for a living is to learn to really love mopping floors.

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

To put it another way, my monthly living expenses are around $3000AUD ($2800 USD, 1900€).

That means at an averaged royalty of $2 I'd have to sell 1400 tees a month just to get by. It's only 1000 tees if all my royalties were $3, but that's still a buttload of tees to sell month in month out.

You start to see just how much where you love comes into play.

sausage_moe
FoodStampDavis said:

The easiest way to do what you love for a living is to learn to really love mopping floors.

this is great, made me laugh! like actually. not the "lol"-stuff. real, sincere laughing. because it's true. I'll work on my love towards mops.

sausage_moe
melmike said:

To put it another way, my monthly living expenses are around $3000AUD ($2800 USD, 1900€).

That means at an averaged royalty of $2 I'd have to sell 1400 tees a month just to get by. It's only 1000 tees if all my royalties were $3, but that's still a buttload of tees to sell month in month out.

You start to see just how much where you love comes into play.

thanks. that's the stuff I was actually interested in!

toolbar
toolbar profile pic Staff
lxromero said:

I also have to say that unfortunately we do work in a field that has a bit of an inherent uphill battle. People like looking at art and admiring it but not everybody likes buying it. When you think of client work sometimes there's also that notion that what you do shouldn't be as expensive as it is.

+1 for realism.

I've gotten into some discussions with artists on why it's not necessarily "wrong" that an artist can't survive 100% solely on producing their art. Certain art forms aren't valued by society proportional to the skill/talent required to produce them...illustration and modern dance come to mind.

I don't think many people disagree that art has value to society, but how much value? Not trying to troll, but on its own, It doesn't feed, it doesn't clothe, it doesn't help the physically sick. It doesn't acquire resources. It doesn't make someone else's job easier. Many of our day jobs do one or more of these things.

Art makes the consumer of it have a feeling, sometimes pleasant, and maybe have some new thoughts/interpretations. On its own, that's definitely not no value. If it's used to market/sell some other good, it's substantially more value. But on its own, I'm not convinced that it is more valuable than a minimum wage job. That said, the demand that is there for certain artforms is diluted...thanks to internets, you're competing at a global level where everyone can publish their art for nearly nothing, instantly.

It would be nice to make money solely from producing your art, but I imagine most of us aren't doing it because of that. We would still create because that's what we want to do.

lxromero
lxromero profile pic Staff
9 designs submitted - Score now!

The first thing I heard when I went into school for orientation was "you're never gonna find a steady job illustrating". This was from a faculty member in my department.

I design tee's for fun but not under the impression that it's ever gonna cover the bills, maybe I'll be able to swing that with freelance work and my own designs but that's gonna require a shit ton of work on top of my actual work work (although it did help me survive for like 4 months of no income). It's not to be disparaging but just to be a realist, we didn't get into the easiest field in the world but sometimes you gotta be hungry while you work to know that you really love it.

sausage_moe
toolbar said:
lxromero said:

I also have to say that unfortunately we do work in a field that has a bit of an inherent uphill battle. People like looking at art and admiring it but not everybody likes buying it. When you think of client work sometimes there's also that notion that what you do shouldn't be as expensive as it is.

+1 for realism.

I've gotten into some discussions with artists on why it's not necessarily "wrong" that an artist can't survive 100% solely on producing their art. Certain art forms aren't valued by society proportional to the skill/talent required to produce them...illustration and modern dance come to mind.

I don't think many people disagree that art has value to society, but how much value? Not trying to troll, but on its own, It doesn't feed, it doesn't clothe, it doesn't help the physically sick. It doesn't acquire resources. It doesn't make someone else's job easier. Many of our day jobs do one or more of these things.

Art makes the consumer of it have a feeling, sometimes pleasant, and maybe have some new thoughts/interpretations. On its own, that's definitely not no value. If it's used to market/sell some other good, it's substantially more value. But on its own, I'm not convinced that it is more valuable than a minimum wage job. That said, the demand that is there for certain artforms is diluted...thanks to internets, you're competing at a global level where everyone can publish their art for nearly nothing, instantly.

It would be nice to make money solely from producing your art, but I imagine most of us aren't doing it because of that. We would still create because that's what we want to do.

in other words: art is luxury. I kind of share your view on this, but at the same time I personnally think, that without art, our (at least my) lives would be a lot more miserable. Of course I could survive without (for example) music, but knowing the joy it produces I did not want to miss it!

I'd love to get involved in a lengthy discussion about this, but I feel really limited by my vocabulary and the art I want to produce right now instead of talking about it ;D

postlopez
postlopez profile pic Alumni

Speaking of music, that's an industry where artists can make a gold-selling album and still be heavily in debt to the label.

Musarter
Musarter profile pic Alumni

I definitely can't float only doing art for a living. I got into Graphic Design for an in between art and business motivation. Over time I have come to the conclusion that art and the artist mentality, at least for me, have very little to do with design. I pursued Illustration on the side for a long time and found, as Luis said, the market is super saturated and agents are only looking for specific types of work that you, as an artist, may or may not be into.

So I am now pursuing another career that will actually pay the bills and allows me time to work on the art I want to. If people want to buy that art that is awesome but if they don't it will not kill me. When your whole sustenance is tied to whether your art sells it can be soul crushing, oppressive, and completely demotivating.

Over time I have also found that my best work is always when I am working for myself, a charity, for free, or for a contest. For some reason when business demands and contrasting opinions enter the mix the art suffers. I am pretty sure it is just me that gets in the way though.

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

In a more general sense, it's probably unrealistic to get into any art form with an expectation of making a living off it. Making some money, sure, but paying the mortgage, and the kid's school fees and all the other bills... I'd say that only a tiny percentage of artists manage that by focusing entirely on their own projects. Even industries like graphic design are so competitive a good percentage of people who start out with dreams of high end studios end up doing something else or printing letterheads at kinko's.

But as with anything, where there's a will, there's usually a way.

The year I got into design school (2000), there were something like 6,000 applicants who sent in a folio of slides. Then there were about 800 interviews. 130 of us got into 1st year. That number halved by the 2nd year. Around 30 of us went into industry placement in our 3rd year and then there was a a very tight-nit group of about 15 who went on to do our honours year.

I've lived off design work every year since then except one (a story for another day).

So yeah, even commercial art and design takes dedication and persistence to get into.

FoodStampDavis
FoodStampDavis profile pic Alumni
postlopez said:

Speaking of music, that's an industry where artists can make a gold-selling album and still be heavily in debt to the label.

Thanks, Spotify!

nickv47
nickv47 profile pic Alumni
melmike said:

In a more general sense, it's probably unrealistic to get into any art form with an expectation of making a living off it. Making some money, sure, but paying the mortgage, and the kid's school fees and all the other bills... I'd say that only a tiny percentage of artists manage that by focusing entirely on their own projects. Even industries like graphic design are so competitive a good percentage of people who start out with dreams of high end studios end up doing something else or printing letterheads at kinko's.

But as with anything, where there's a will, there's usually a way.

The year I got into design school (2000), there were something like 6,000 applicants who sent in a folio of slides. Then there were about 800 interviews. 130 of us got into 1st year. That number halved by the 2nd year. Around 30 of us went into industry placement in our 3rd year and then there was a a very tight-nit group of about 15 who went on to do our honours year.

I've lived off design work every year since then except one (a story for another day).

So yeah, even commercial art and design takes dedication and persistence to get into.

hard work trumps talent, when talent isn't working. basically.

JaymeArt

I don't think many people disagree that art has value to society, but how much value? Not trying to troll, but on its own, It doesn't feed, it doesn't clothe, it doesn't help the physically sick. It doesn't acquire resources. It doesn't make someone else's job easier. Many of our day jobs do one or more of these things. ~toolbar

Art may not be necessary in a practical way, but I think it has great value. Art isnt supposed to do those things anyway, is it? I think the arts make it possible to bear some day jobs, (that can be soul crushing, mind numbing 9-5 drudgery)

"The value of art is in its humanizing qualities. A populace without an art education, and I mean all the arts, is a dysfunctional one: self-involved, in which making money is the main goal, and anger is the primary emotion. Wordsworth's poem about "getting and spending we lay waste our powers" is true. Therefore, in my view, art is necessary for our survival as a species." --Nikki Ausschnitt, painter, SF CA

I think there's no question that art is as much a part of our human nature as eating, breathing, sleeping, procreation, communicating, etc. There is no time in history that people did not make art or perform art. It's just how we are. The issue becomes not if art is necessary, but how much we choose to nurture and support what is innate in us. --Miriam Grosman

lxromero
lxromero profile pic Staff
9 designs submitted - Score now!
Jayme Art said:

I don't think many people disagree that art has value to society, but how much value? Not trying to troll, but on its own, It doesn't feed, it doesn't clothe, it doesn't help the physically sick. It doesn't acquire resources. It doesn't make someone else's job easier. Many of our day jobs do one or more of these things. ~toolbar

Art may not be necessary in a practical way, but I think it has great value. Art isnt supposed to do those things anyway, is it? I think the arts make it possible to bear some day jobs, (that can be soul crushing, mind numbing 9-5 drudgery)

"The value of art is in its humanizing qualities. A populace without an art education, and I mean all the arts, is a dysfunctional one: self-involved, in which making money is the main goal, and anger is the primary emotion. Wordsworth's poem about "getting and spending we lay waste our powers" is true. Therefore, in my view, art is necessary for our survival as a species." --Nikki Ausschnitt, painter, SF CA

I think there's no question that art is as much a part of our human nature as eating, breathing, sleeping, procreation, communicating, etc. There is no time in history that people did not make art or perform art. It's just how we are. The issue becomes not if art is necessary, but how much we choose to nurture and support what is innate in us. --Miriam Grosman

It's a good theoretical discussion but in the practical sense most people look at something and say "that's nice and pretty" and then move on because they already received the gratification they needed from the artwork, there's no need to spend money on something that's "free"

We are more keen to the value of art because we are in one way or another artists and therefore closer to understand its value and meaning more than your average person, the problem lies in that we rely on the average person as the consumer of our art

JaymeArt
lxromero said:
Jayme Art said:

I don't think many people disagree that art has value to society, but how much value? Not trying to troll, but on its own, It doesn't feed, it doesn't clothe, it doesn't help the physically sick. It doesn't acquire resources. It doesn't make someone else's job easier. Many of our day jobs do one or more of these things. ~toolbar

Art may not be necessary in a practical way, but I think it has great value. Art isnt supposed to do those things anyway, is it? I think the arts make it possible to bear some day jobs, (that can be soul crushing, mind numbing 9-5 drudgery)

"The value of art is in its humanizing qualities. A populace without an art education, and I mean all the arts, is a dysfunctional one: self-involved, in which making money is the main goal, and anger is the primary emotion. Wordsworth's poem about "getting and spending we lay waste our powers" is true. Therefore, in my view, art is necessary for our survival as a species." --Nikki Ausschnitt, painter, SF CA

I think there's no question that art is as much a part of our human nature as eating, breathing, sleeping, procreation, communicating, etc. There is no time in history that people did not make art or perform art. It's just how we are. The issue becomes not if art is necessary, but how much we choose to nurture and support what is innate in us. --Miriam Grosman

It's a good theoretical discussion but in the practical sense most people look at something and say "that's nice and pretty" and then move on because they already received the gratification they needed from the artwork, there's no need to spend money on something that's "free"

We are more keen to the value of art because we are in one way or another artists and therefore closer to understand its value and meaning more than your average person, the problem lies in that we rely on the average person as the consumer of our art

True. Not all move on though. If the concern is making money, an artist just has to keep making stuff and putting it out there till they connect with their target -- those who like their work and get the gratification from owning it. :] I see people saying that the internet is part of the problem, saturation and all, but its also useful, if not an indispensable tool for finding the right buyers for ones art.

Lucky artists are the ones who dont have to worry about the marketing end of it all.

postlopez
postlopez profile pic Alumni
FoodStampDavis said:
postlopez said:

Speaking of music, that's an industry where artists can make a gold-selling album and still be heavily in debt to the label.

Thanks, Spotify!

I wouldn't even necessarily blame Spotify for that either. Artists getting dicked around by labels, managers, etc. isn't a new story. Label accountants can be creative, or just inattentive. And royalty rates could be too low for many artists to recoup their initial advances.

gasponce
Jayme Art said:

True. Not all move on though. If the concern is making money, an artist just has to keep making stuff and putting it out there till they connect with their target -- those who like their work and get the gratification from owning it. :] I see people saying that the internet is part of the problem, saturation and all, but its also useful, if not an indispensable tool for finding the right buyers for ones art.

Lucky artists are the ones who dont have to worry about the marketing end of it all.

Agreed 100%

louisroskosch
louisroskosch profile pic Alumni
Jayme Art said:

I don't think many people disagree that art has value to society, but how much value? Not trying to troll, but on its own, It doesn't feed, it doesn't clothe, it doesn't help the physically sick. It doesn't acquire resources. It doesn't make someone else's job easier. Many of our day jobs do one or more of these things. ~toolbar

Art may not be necessary in a practical way, but I think it has great value. Art isnt supposed to do those things anyway, is it? I think the arts make it possible to bear some day jobs, (that can be soul crushing, mind numbing 9-5 drudgery)

"The value of art is in its humanizing qualities. A populace without an art education, and I mean all the arts, is a dysfunctional one: self-involved, in which making money is the main goal, and anger is the primary emotion. Wordsworth's poem about "getting and spending we lay waste our powers" is true. Therefore, in my view, art is necessary for our survival as a species." --Nikki Ausschnitt, painter, SF CA

I think there's no question that art is as much a part of our human nature as eating, breathing, sleeping, procreation, communicating, etc. There is no time in history that people did not make art or perform art. It's just how we are. The issue becomes not if art is necessary, but how much we choose to nurture and support what is innate in us. --Miriam Grosman

i got an idea for ya ;) lets try sticking that 'unnecessary' art on something people need to wear everyday...a t-shirt! could be on to a winner here..

louisroskosch
louisroskosch profile pic Alumni

i could have this discussion about comics for sure. i really wish i had a good way to make money from comic. they take so so so much time and effort to create for very little in return.

illustration i could must up some grumblings too. i don't get jobs very often and its a hassle even when i do.

t-shirts tho i got nothin to complain about!

louisroskosch
louisroskosch profile pic Alumni

truly sorry for the piss poor spelling in that last comment... i have had a few drinks tonight.

opifan64
opifan64 profile pic Alumni

I recently quit my full time job to devote my time entirely to art. I don't currently earn enough each month, so this gambit is being subsidized with my savings. With my mortgage and living costs I need north of $2,000 a month to survive and right now I'm not there yet, but I know it's possible since I have artist friends who average $5000 - $10,000 a month on PoD sites alone, without even doing freelance. If you're only doing art part-time it's a catch 22 because you don't have the necessary time to be competitive. My savings should float me for a year or two so I'm hoping in that time I can solidify my position as an artist and not have to go back to a 9-5 job in order to survive.

postlopez
postlopez profile pic Alumni
louisroskosch said:

i could have this discussion about comics for sure. i really wish i had a good way to make money from comic. they take so so so much time and effort to create for very little in return.

Totally, my wife writes and draws comics full-time right now. It would be extremely hard to sustain solely on what she earns from it. And when you produce your own books, you can easily lose money.

JaymeArt

i got an idea for ya ;) lets try sticking that 'unnecessary' art on something people need to wear everyday...a t-shirt! could be on to a winner here.. ~louisroskosch

I agree! Except for the unnecessary part ;D

louisroskosch
louisroskosch profile pic Alumni

opifan: congrats! you will smash that target no doubt. i took the plunge with no savings -i had cheap rent at the time and very little steam behind me. more or less starting from scratch in the t shirt game.

my goal was similar, earn enough each month to live off. i'm currently doing better than that and no signs of slowing down yet!

opifan64
opifan64 profile pic Alumni
louisroskosch said:

opifan: congrats! you will smash that target no doubt. i took the plunge with no savings -i had cheap rent at the time and very little steam behind me. more or less starting from scratch in the t shirt game.

my goal was similar, earn enough each month to live off. i'm currently doing better than that and no signs of slowing down yet!

Wow, that's amazing, man! That's a very bold move to take that leap of faith but I think it's necessary. There's no use doing something in half measures and I wish I had done it earlier, to be honest. Given the quality of your work, I'm not surprised you're making a go of it, but it's good to see examples of success. It's too easy to get mired in a negative frame of mind. The people I see doing really well always have a certain belief in themselves and a very positive attitude, so I'm trying to foster that.

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

Yep, I agree you've got to take the plunge to make it work. It forces you to put in the work as you've got no other option.

The Paper Crane
The Paper Crane profile pic Alumni

You will inevitably need some bread and butter. Part time paid work and part time illustrator is probably your best bet so you at least have some guaranteed income to cover the bills. Alternatively, as suggested, move to a cheaper country. Something I am seriously considering as the uk is silly and I am totally priced out of the housing market here.

louisroskosch
louisroskosch profile pic Alumni

cheers! it wasn't that bold though, i was really hard up at the time but it has worked out great!

i basically moved to another country and was planning to do English teaching to pay the bills. then i learned that you had to do all kinds of singing and dancing to entertain the kids.. the idea horrfied me! i had no luck finding any other jobs so i eventually decided to choose t shirts as a way to make a living, as it was something i had earned good money from before, and i knew others were doing it (such as seeing letter q talking about it on this forum) i think being decisive was the important factor, if you do that, and don't give yourself a plan b you will force yourself to figure it out.

opifan64
opifan64 profile pic Alumni

Yeah, reminds me of one of my favourite quotes:

-Goethe- 'Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back. Always ineffectiveness concerning all acts of initiation and creation. There is one elementary truth, the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans; That the moment one definitely commits oneself, then providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues, from the decision, raising in one's favour all manner of unforeseen incidents and meetings, and material assistance, which no one could have dreamed would have come their way. Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now.'

RonanL
RonanL profile pic Alumni

Yo Eric! I've always been curious - can you link to some of the artist who are making so much on PoD sites? It'd be nice to study how they go about their business online.

opifan64
opifan64 profile pic Alumni
RonanL said:

Yo Eric! I've always been curious - can you link to some of the artist who are making so much on PoD sites? It'd be nice to study how they go about their business online.

I understand that it would be useful, but I was told through private messages, so I'm not sure if they'd be too cool with me announcing their earnings online lol. If you go to the popular tab on society6 I imagine you can get a pretty good idea of some artists who are making serious money (although I don't know them all personally).

RonanL
RonanL profile pic Alumni

Totally understandable. It's just man - that's insane the money they're making especially relative to how many people are making like $5 a month even after a long time.

sausage_moe

Wow! This thread has surprisingly positive! I like that.

@opifan: where's that quote from? Would love to re-read in german! Even if I won't be making the plunge anytime soon I feel it exactly describes my past and present problems and offers a kind of solution.

opifan64
opifan64 profile pic Alumni
sausage_moe said:

Wow! This thread has surprisingly positive! I like that.

@opifan: where's that quote from? Would love to re-read in german! Even if I won't be making the plunge anytime soon I feel it exactly describes my past and present problems and offers a kind of solution.

I'm not sure where the original quote is. I just saw it posted somewhere in English. I know what you mean, man. I was stuck in a similar quandary, but I think the quote is actually true in many cases. My brother said that when he quit his job as a pharmacy assistant to pursue art full-time that that's exactly what happened - so many possibilities arose from his initial decision... possibilities that wouldn't have otherwise have presented themselves.

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni
sausage_moe said:

Wow! This thread has surprisingly positive! I like that.

@opifan: where's that quote from? Would love to re-read in german! Even if I won't be making the plunge anytime soon I feel it exactly describes my past and present problems and offers a kind of solution.

I too am familiar with this quote, and found it inspiring in my own endeavours. However, it turns out that it's not by Goethe, but by a Scottish Mountaineer called WH Murray. The last 3 sentences: "Whatever you can do, or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power, and magic in it. Begin it now.', he incorrectly attributed to Goethe in his book.

I say incorrectly because apparently no one's been able to find the original german quote. The closest thing they can find is this from Faust:

Der Worte sind genug gewechselt, lasst mich auch endlich Taten sehn!

Not the same, but a similarish sentiment.

Luckily it doesn't matter who wrote it in the end. It's still a bloody good quote which has proven itself true many times over in my life.

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