Close
One second...

Royalties

It is just not the same, the motivation to sub has gone... understand why threadless have done it, but I am struggling to get motivated to sub....

Watch this
Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9
  10. ... 20
TheInfamousBaka
TheInfamousBaka profile pic Alumni

Same here, mostly because I feel like I wouldn't make much from royalties. I understand why they're doing it too, just hard to find the motivation to make stuff.

fightstacy
fightstacy profile pic Alumni

I third that, I've also found that a shirt I subbed somewhere else, has sold only 30 or so shirts, but has made me royalties that equal like 140 shirts here. ..it's getting tricky to muster up the same enthusiasm for Threadless that I had just a couple months ago.

Ryder
Ryder profile pic Alumni

it's making me sub to the challenges...

i wouldn't be surprised if threadless went back to it's old model after all this protest... but, i wouldn't be surprised if they just kept doing the new thing too... i just wish they'd kept that one thing that made them different than all the other shirt sites...

opifan64
opifan64 profile pic Alumni

I feel more inspired... but then, I don't slot Threadless into a separate category apart from other sites. It's just another potential source of income, although it will always have a special place in my heart. For one thing it's the reason I got back into art again. Royalties have a cumulative effect, and for me are much better than lump payments.

YaaH
YaaH profile pic Alumni

Sub for $10K. If it doesn't work well TL will change a new way again ^_^

fightstacy
fightstacy profile pic Alumni
opifan64 said:

it will always have a special place in my heart. For one thing it's the reason I got back into art again. Royalties have a cumulative effect, and for me are much better than lump payments.

Oh, absolutely, I owe Threadless so much in terms of inspiration, meeting awesome people and helping me in a million ways, ..but the fact that it has become the one that rewards the least as well as dropped the design exclusivity, ..it's made it difficult for me.

fightstacy
fightstacy profile pic Alumni

I'd like to keep my Threadless prints exclusive to here, ..but other places do offer like 400% the money

fightstacy
fightstacy profile pic Alumni
BurritoGoblin said:

I feel more motivated to make things that will sell a shitload. That's a challenge in itself.

Yeah, that's a positive side effect

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni

Not sure if less motivated... Or just less disappointed when not getting printed anyway!

More motivation to sub for the challenges I guess. Without up front cash and with not so competitive royalties the general contest might dwindle away. But like opifan64 said, no need to stick to just one site. Gotta spread out. Without the 90 days rule or exclusivity just sub the same design everywhere.

Mr Rocks
Mr Rocks profile pic Alumni
mechanicalrobotpower said:
BurritoGoblin said:

I feel more motivated to make things that will sell a shitload. That's a challenge in itself.

Yeah, that's a positive side effect

I do not see this a positive side effect. This used to be an open platform for any art, all kinds of cool crazy art that would never float with other apparel companies.

Now people are not motivated to sub 'art' as much as 'will this be a best seller?'. I see a truckload of cats and doctor who shirts in Threadless's future.

I said this in another thread, but I do not want to try and have the next communist party, mister mittens or funkalious because that's not my style. Realistically, I will nver see a 2k pay day here again as my design NEVER reprint, and I suspect that 80% of artists are in the same boat as me.

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni

Actually I feel more motivated to sub weird shit because I figure Threadless now has less to lose when picking some offbeat stuff for prints

mike bautista
mike bautista profile pic Alumni
mechanicalrobotpower said:
BurritoGoblin said:

I feel more motivated to make things that will sell a shitload. That's a challenge in itself.

Yeah, that's a positive side effect

it's hard for me to think of something that'll sell well that isn't a pop culture reference or something clever. I've mostly avoided doing those anyway. I feel like the royalty system might help cooler, artsy designs get made, but small pay is kind of a bummer. double-edged sword. but I've never really seen Threadless as a reliable means for me to make money anyway, old pay system or not, so I can't be too sad about it. but now that I actually need money I'm gonna have to start checking other places out.

fightstacy
fightstacy profile pic Alumni
Mr Rocks said:
mechanicalrobotpower said:
BurritoGoblin said:

I feel more motivated to make things that will sell a shitload. That's a challenge in itself.

Yeah, that's a positive side effect

I do not see this a positive side effect. This used to be an open platform for any art, all kinds of cool crazy art that would never float with other apparel companies.

Now people are not motivated to sub 'art' as much as 'will this be a best seller?'. I see a truckload of cats and doctor who shirts in Threadless's future.

I said this in another thread, but I do not want to try and have the next communist party, mister mittens or funkalious because that's not my style. Realistically, I will nver see a 2k pay day here again as my design NEVER reprint, and I suspect that 80% of artists are in the same boat as me.

I see it as a positive side effect in that it would push me harder, ..I never thought pop-culture at all, ..I've definitely changed and adapted since Threadless, and I see more change and adaptation as good, ..but yeah, I do not support Threadless becoming Tee Fury

EZFL
EZFL profile pic Alumni
BurritoGoblin said:

I feel more motivated to make things that will sell a shitload. That's a challenge in itself.

Making things that will print/sell is no fun. You take away the fun and it becomes work... work you may never be compensated for. This falls into that widely hated category of spec work.

Mr Rocks
Mr Rocks profile pic Alumni
EZFL said:
BurritoGoblin said:

I feel more motivated to make things that will sell a shitload. That's a challenge in itself.

Making things that will print/sell is no fun. You take away the fun and it becomes work... work you may never be compensated for. This falls into that widely hated category of spec work.

exactly

What I never thought of Threadless, as spec, but now effectively is.

Mr Rocks
Mr Rocks profile pic Alumni
Morkki said:

Actually I feel more motivated to sub weird shit because I figure Threadless now has less to lose when picking some offbeat stuff for prints

This is fine if your motivation is seeing your shirt print and $250 credit. Less to lose is great for business I know, but I thinks there's a greater chance of less earning as an artisit on the off beat stuff. I always knew this at Threaldess, but at least your art was rewarded equally before, now it's a matter of taste.

I am not bitter because my stuff doesn;'t re-print, I just realise that I won't be making any where close to the 2k here anymore. I said it beofre, I doubt 80% (imho) of artists here will. (based on sales of course, not challenges.)

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

Yep, I guess it will all come down to individual designers asking themselves why they do what they do. The 2k was brilliant if you could get it, but now that it's off the table, I personally won't stop making designs, although I get why a lot of people might.

I support these changes in principle, but if in a year's time we can't find anyone who's made more than 2k from one design, then that will also no doubt influence that support.

Also, Mr Rocks, I totally agree with what you're saying about we shouldn't feel forced to just become a bitch to pop-culture, but I don't agree that your work can't have mass appeal. Maybe so far it hasn't, but we can look to some very successful prints and artists in general on this site that don't reference pop-culture at all.

mike bautista
mike bautista profile pic Alumni

yeah, creating a design that has mass appeal but not falling to those tropes is what I think they meant by challenge, which sounds pretty fun depending on your attitude on it.

mike bautista
mike bautista profile pic Alumni

and threadless has always been an outlet for me to challenge myself. dunno how to tackle this challenge, though!

Mr Rocks
Mr Rocks profile pic Alumni
melmike said:

Also, Mr Rocks, I totally agree with what you're saying about we shouldn't feel forced to just become a bitch to pop-culture, but I don't agree that your work can't have mass appeal. Maybe so far it hasn't, but we can look to some very successful prints and artists in general on this site that don't reference pop-culture at all.

I have found that my work doesn't have mass appeal here already. The only reprinted design was doom reggatta, and that was Ross's brain child, I just held the pencil.

I get what you're saying, but it's all now a challenge that didn't exist before, and that was a big part of what Iliked about Threadless. I appreciate your positivelty I really do, but the realist in me knows that my stuff won't float here as far as sales go.

And when I want to do pop culture stuff I will take it to another site where I know I will get $1000 + $2 per day after first day sales.

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

fair enough. I tried to sell prints on Etsy and made diddly squat, then took them to pop.com.au and they sold like crazy. So yeah, I agree, it is all about finding your audience. Your work is great though, I hate to hear that these changes are driving good people like you away.

sonmi
sonmi profile pic Alumni

I agree entirely with Mr Rocks. The more I think about this royalty-based system, the more I am saddened. Threadless really is beginning to feel like any other t-shirt site, and I feel like the calibur of unique designs submitted here will suffer under this new payment system. Maybe it's to a fault, but I want to be loyal to Threadless. I don't want to submit to other t-shirt sites, and I miss when Threadless paid fairly to keep the best designs with them. I don't want to potentially earn $100 on a design here just so I can submit it to other sites as well. I want to see the best t-shirt designs on Threadless alone. It makes it feel less like a community. Less special.

It seems crazy that IF you sell 1,000 designs (if I recall correctly, in the hey-day when you could check how much of a shirt was stocked, it was ~1,000), at a rate of $0.25/shirt (the minimum amount you can make), you get paid $250. That's buttons. I'm not sure if you earn even less during a sale, but if that's the case, if you have a poor-selling design, then it's most likely going to sell the most during a sale, so you'll make even less than that.

I love Threadless still, which is why this makes me sad. I want weird designs to be on the same playing field, monetarily, as mass-appeal designs. I'm fine with designing for the latter, but I don't want to feel like I only should design those if I want to make any sort of money. I'd much rather have a weird design have less of a chance of winning a flat-out payment of $2000, than more of a chance to win maybe $100.

Maybe I'm being incorrect with my numbers here, and if so, I'd love to be corrected. Has Jake or anyone posted potential earnings including what an artist normally earns per shirt?

I still love you, Threadless, and I really want to start designing more for you again, but I feel like this new system is not really about the artists, unless you're an artist prone to designing pop culture super-sellers.

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

If a tee sells for $25, I think you get closer to $2.5. $20 you get something like $2 or just under. Only when they sell for $9.95 might you get $0.25 I believe. There's another thread about showing how much Haasbroek has made this month with his new Beer tee, which shows $345.05 for 174 sales, or $1.98 a sale (including both $25 and $20 price points).

If you extrapolate the full remaining stock (469 units) on hand of this design and you get to a bit over $900. So I suppose he has the potential of making a maximum of $1200-ish of this first print. Of course, if the tee goes on sale before it sells out, that will decrease that number significantly.

thompson98
sonmi said:

I agree entirely with Mr Rocks. The more I think about this royalty-based system, the more I am saddened. Threadless really is beginning to feel like any other t-shirt site, and I feel like the calibur of unique designs submitted here will suffer under this new payment system. Maybe it's to a fault, but I want to be loyal to Threadless. I don't want to submit to other t-shirt sites, and I miss when Threadless paid fairly to keep the best designs with them. I don't want to potentially earn $100 on a design here just so I can submit it to other sites as well. I want to see the best t-shirt designs on Threadless alone. It makes it feel less like a community. Less special.

It seems crazy that IF you sell 1,000 designs (if I recall correctly, in the hey-day when you could check how much of a shirt was stocked, it was ~1,000), at a rate of $0.25/shirt (the minimum amount you can make), you get paid $250. That's buttons. I'm not sure if you earn even less during a sale, but if that's the case, if you have a poor-selling design, then it's most likely going to sell the most during a sale, so you'll make even less than that.

I love Threadless still, which is why this makes me sad. I want weird designs to be on the same playing field, monetarily, as mass-appeal designs. I'm fine with designing for the latter, but I don't want to feel like I only should design those if I want to make any sort of money. I'd much rather have a weird design have less of a chance of winning a flat-out payment of $2000, than more of a chance to win maybe $100.

Maybe I'm being incorrect with my numbers here, and if so, I'd love to be corrected. Has Jake or anyone posted potential earnings including what an artist normally earns per shirt?

I still love you, Threadless, and I really want to start designing more for you again, but I feel like this new system is not really about the artists, unless you're an artist prone to designing pop culture super-sellers.

Totally agree. And the fact that they made it like the royalties and tipping will 'benefit the artists' is a joke. I will still sub here but probably challenges only. I will be going to other sites more often now i think

Mr Rocks
Mr Rocks profile pic Alumni

Really well written Jules, I too feel like I owe Threadless a lot.You pretty much summed up exactly how I feel, but better written than I.

mip1980
mip1980 profile pic Alumni

I am not so upset about the royalties switch because like Mr Rocks i have also not been reprinted but what upsets me is this....When i got the email to say i had been selected by threadless, i told my girlfriend, she burst into tears because she was so proud and she knew it was something i had set myself a goal of. Then she researched Threadless when she got home from work and she realised what a massive deal it was to get printed here. Its not about the money for me but the exclusivity, i felt like was part of a special group of a select few out of the millions of artists from around the world. Now since this change i kind of feel that threadless is losing that prestige it had, people are starting to dwindle away and that makes me sad. I care not for the $2000 because earning a living as an artist is incredibly tough and we all need full time jobs anyway, i do care that threadless feels like it is becoming like the rest.

very sad

L-M-N-O-P
L-M-N-O-P profile pic Alumni
sonmi said:

I agree entirely with Mr Rocks. The more I think about this royalty-based system, the more I am saddened. Threadless really is beginning to feel like any other t-shirt site, and I feel like the calibur of unique designs submitted here will suffer under this new payment system. Maybe it's to a fault, but I want to be loyal to Threadless. I don't want to submit to other t-shirt sites, and I miss when Threadless paid fairly to keep the best designs with them. I don't want to potentially earn $100 on a design here just so I can submit it to other sites as well. I want to see the best t-shirt designs on Threadless alone. It makes it feel less like a community. Less special.

It seems crazy that IF you sell 1,000 designs (if I recall correctly, in the hey-day when you could check how much of a shirt was stocked, it was ~1,000), at a rate of $0.25/shirt (the minimum amount you can make), you get paid $250. That's buttons. I'm not sure if you earn even less during a sale, but if that's the case, if you have a poor-selling design, then it's most likely going to sell the most during a sale, so you'll make even less than that.

I love Threadless still, which is why this makes me sad. I want weird designs to be on the same playing field, monetarily, as mass-appeal designs. I'm fine with designing for the latter, but I don't want to feel like I only should design those if I want to make any sort of money. I'd much rather have a weird design have less of a chance of winning a flat-out payment of $2000, than more of a chance to win maybe $100.

Maybe I'm being incorrect with my numbers here, and if so, I'd love to be corrected. Has Jake or anyone posted potential earnings including what an artist normally earns per shirt?

I still love you, Threadless, and I really want to start designing more for you again, but I feel like this new system is not really about the artists, unless you're an artist prone to designing pop culture super-sellers.

This.

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni

I'm guessing that a shirt's royalties will average around $1, some of them being sold full price and some (most) during sales. I know that's below just about any other site but just saying that the 25 cents for every shirt scenario isn't likely.

Going from $2K up front to a slow trickle of dollars is of course a giant change but other than that, is there a reason for thinking that 2000 bucks is a baseline for what a shirt design should earn? My personal baseline would be $500. I've happily sold designs at that price to Threadless and don't feel ripped off. But YMMV of course.

I'm all for artists getting a fair compensation for their work. And since the art is what sells the shirts here then the artists should be getting a paycheck that doesn't make them feel ripped off. That still doesn't mean, in my opinion, that every design should be worth the same kind of cash. The audience decides what they want (and it seriously isn't just pop culture).

mike bautista
mike bautista profile pic Alumni
sonmi said:

I want weird designs to be on the same playing field, monetarily, as mass-appeal designs. [...] I'd much rather have a weird design have less of a chance of winning a flat-out payment of $2000, than more of a chance to win maybe $100.

I didn't see that angle before, but I very much agree with it.

I don't think I can explain my reasoning eloquently enough, but back in the day I felt like getting printed here was a huge accomplishment. not so much because you'd get paid $2000, but knowing your work was worth that much. in some way there was something validating in knowing that weird stuff was valued just as much as mass-appeal stuff. at least for me, when I was younger and started to get into this and art and everything.

recently I've been more serious about making money off of my work in general, outside of threadless. I've got other goals for myself now. and my perspective on how to earn changes with the experience I get and the directions I wanna take. but I guess since this site is what motivated me and helped me grow, it's been my main resource in measuring commercial success and appeal. echoing what Morkki said, my personal baseline for designs is a lot lower than $2000, but knowing there was a site out there who paid that much and paid it to a bunch of varied artists felt like a supportive place to try what you want. threadless has always had the klout score to get stuff out there and in the eyes of a lot more people, including potential partners/clients/work opportunities, but [I don't know how to end this thought. g'night! I'll say though that I like this conversation about the royalties more than the other blogs talking about it]

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

I think Threadless has a secret place in all our hearts, the ideas of prestige, exclusivity and being 'elite' were fantastic characteristics for a website to inspire in its artists. But if you think about it, how many designs were printed and flopped, how much left over stock is there for those designs, how many times has Threadless effectively bank rolled ineffective designs that just didn't sell?

I know this is a big change and dropping from 2k to a performance related unknown quantity is a bit daunting. But surely this is fairer across the board.

I also don't see the correlation between the change in contract to an upsurge in pop-culture tees. If anything I've always seen Threadless as a Champion of more arty t-shirt designs. Yes it has a some Doctor Who and computer game character pieces scattered here and there but by and large it promotes work that would otherwise go unprinted on most other sites.

What I'm interested in seeing is whether with the relaxed contract whether more t-shirts will now be printed, which, if so I think will be problematic for sales. The more tees printed in any given week will probably mean less sales for freshly printed artists as the choice is larger. I hope they keep the selection relatively tight and focused in order to give the new prints on new contracts a chance at greater sales.

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni
radiomode said:
Morkki said:

Going from $2K up front to a slow trickle of dollars is of course a giant change but other than that, is there a reason for thinking that 2000 bucks is a baseline for what a shirt design should earn? My personal baseline would be $500. I've happily sold designs at that price to Threadless and don't feel ripped off. But YMMV of course.

Morkki, from what I get, the main issue in this particular blog is whether the royalty justify competing for (thus motivation to sub). If say Threadless just turn into POD, this issue will not happen. The fact is that you need to compete for a number that isn't so promising.

I understand that, but I see the general contest more like a lottery than a competition. A lottery with a potentially smaller prize now. It's not a competition in the sense that winning is not directly related to the effort made. Getting a great score but not getting a print out of it still feels like a bigger disappointment than getting a print and at least some pocket change. If you think about the design as a shirt design that can be sold at a number of sites including Threadless and not as a design made for Threadless then the effort involved is really just slapping together a submission slide.

In the challenges the competition aspect hasn't changed, everyone is still going for the big prize. In fact, the jackpot is now even bigger since you get the royalties on top of the cash prize starting from the first shirt sold. I personally don't really like the emphasis on the challenges as the scoring there is brutal.

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni

Also having a design chosen by Threadless but shunned by the consumers feels like crap, even if I only got $500. I know it's nobody's fault but I still feel it's on me, somehow.

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni

What I'm interested in seeing is whether with the relaxed contract whether more t-shirts will now be printed, which, if so I think will be problematic for sales. The more tees printed in any given week will probably mean less sales for freshly printed artists as the choice is larger. I hope they keep the selection relatively tight and focused in order to give the new prints on new contracts a chance at greater sales.

This, I think, has been a problem for quite a while. Not so much a problem for the artists before the Royalty Apocalypse but a problem for Threadless.

Edword
Edword profile pic Alumni

Lots of great points made here and I've been reading all of these threads the last couple day and am truly sad. I've been focused on other thing in the last couple years but have alway been proud to have been printed here. It was a major goal to be printed and it gave me the confidence to move forward with other projects.

I always wondered how threadless was able to pay out 2 grand and make a profit and I admired there willingness to print "out there" designs that they had to know would never make a huge profit if any.

I was excited when I heard about the royalties and rights, I was thinking dang threadless is always looking out for the artist but I didn't realize they were dropping the 2 grand from the regular contest. I could see reducing the 2000 and doing a prize royalties mix but to drop the upfront money all together is rough.

ThePaperCrane
ThePaperCrane profile pic Alumni

I have read this entire thread and relate to a lot of what has been said but don't want to repeat anything. Just want to add the following points:

There is a general misconception here that with the new payment changes everyone is going to have to make pop culture tees now in an attempt to try and make a big seller, that will at least equal the old $2k?

Threadless has a very diverse customer base and product range and it is not just pop culture that sells well here. Even some of the best sellers are not 'pop culture'. Look at Funkalisious and Mr Mittens, they were not originally pop culture until they got printed and become popular.

Non of my printed designs have been a pop culture reference/mashup or pun yet each one has been reprinted at least once or twice.

I, like everyone else loved the big payout, who wouldn't, but $2k for every design (regardless of how it is going to preform) is just not sustainable for Threadless anymore when you considering the developments in digital printing, growth of print on demand and huge rise in competition.

As said by others, we do need to give the new system some time to see if it is still viable for us as individual artists. If your work does not sell well here then maybe the market for your work is elsewhere? At the end of the day we need to remember that T-shirt design is not fine art, it is commercial in nature. The world of business is constantly and rapidly changing and we have two choices: keep up and adapt or drop out.

PS. I am seriously considering dropping out. Anyone want to join me is starting up a REAL community were everything we do is for love not money?

louisroskosch
louisroskosch profile pic Alumni
mip1980 said:

I care not for the $2000 because earning a living as an artist is incredibly tough and we all need full time jobs anyway,

very sad

speak for yourself buddy!

morkki: i think you hit the nail on the head there.. threadless is more of a lottery, so the big prize kind of justified that. now its a lottery with a small prize, iffy royalty rates and a monthly payment.. a monthly payment if you are lucky enough to win the lottery.

maybe threadless's business model is getting outdated. the shirt a day sites and print on demand both work because they don't lose stock and you get a set royalty (that is more than $0.25) they are fair because you earn what you sell. if you have a sale then you actually earn more..not less.

taz-pie

i just want to buy weird butt stuff. as long as you guys keep getting your weird stuff printed, i will keep buying here.

ok so i didn't read anything up there, but yeah.

kazualtee

Kind of a bummer not every shirt can get $2000 anymore but it does make more business sense. The potential to earn more than 2k is still there as others have said. The large amount of traffic and the shirts being screen printed are good reasons to still sub here in my opinion.

Musarter
Musarter profile pic Alumni

So many good points have been made already. The cold turkey cut of all upfront payments was a bold move and will probably make many artists leave, which is sad. Threadless must have known this and thought the risk was worth it in the long run. I personally would have been much happier with a smaller upfront payment, say even as low as $500 for the first printing, and having the royalties payment come into play for additional print runs. No matter what anyone says, if you receive an upfront payment it feels more like you have achieved or won something. A royalties only system feels a bit like every other POD site out there.

I think the new system's feel will take some of the prestige out of getting a print here and will stop many from pushing, to get a print, the way that they used to. Who knows, I may be wrong, but a lot of people seem to be echoing this sentiment.

JIMDAHOUSECAT
JIMDAHOUSECAT profile pic Alumni

I personally think that Threadless should just split $2000 to the top 3 selling designs in the week they launch. So top selling design $1000, second $750 and third $250 (artists would receive the 20% of net profits)

opifan64
opifan64 profile pic Alumni

I think there's a tendency to focus on a large, one-time payment because there's an instant gratification that comes with that, but the reality is that royalties are a fairer and potentially more profitable compensation model. Not every design will earn a huge sum of money, but there are lots of other avenues to licence that design, so the overall earning potential of a popular design (over years) might still be a lot higher than that lump payment. I don't buy the pop culture argument either. The highest selling shirt on woot is not a pop culture design, it's an Edgar Allen Poe design which I think has earned the artist something north of $70,000 in royalties the last time I checked. Royalties are not the enemy, I just think there's an entrenched reaction against them because people are accustomed to the old system. I'd rather make $2,000 a month consistently on PoD sites rather than counting on an occasional lump payment. I know lots of people making far more than that, and none of them are more talented than anyone posting in this thread. That's why I think the negativity, while understandable, is a bit unwarranted.

Farnell
Farnell profile pic Alumni

Everyone has a personal opinion on this, my issue is that once you have been printed a few times on the old model, that 2K payment was incredible and it motivated me to keep subbing and doing new stuff... dribs and drabs of a few dollars here and there just isn't motivating me at the moment...

louisroskosch
louisroskosch profile pic Alumni

what competition does threadless have for similar websites? who prints similar types of shirts? excluding P.O.D. i wouldn't mind taking a look as threadless is kind of on its own in my eyes.

PrettyUgly008
Ryder said:

So wait, we only get the royalties when we are dead?

Mat Miller

My gut feeling is that these changes have been made ultimately to generate more traffic to the site resulting in more sales (one would hope). Instead of an initial post on social media by artists to say 'Hey I've been printed, go buy a shirt', there will be a constant stream of links here, there and everywhere being posted all over the internet from printed designers to try and make some sales. It's free marketing and it's a clever change from a business point of view. The majority of e-commerce sites like Society6's traffic will undoubtedly come from artists advertising their own products at no cost to the company.

I don't think this is necessarily a bad thing for the artists either as increased traffic to the site is potentially more eyes on your products and work even if it wasn't your products that they initially came to look at. It annoys me when some artists/designers say that they just want to create and don't want to have to try and market themselves. Why don't you want to? Everyone else offering a particular service or skill set has to.

Yes, the already popular T's that sell lots at present will continue to sell. Some newly picked designs may achieve good sales in time and some designs will inevitably be left in the dark. It's with these designs that I imagine Threadless have actually lost money producing the T-shirt rather than turned a profit when you take into account the old reward system.

I also believe that this will benefit artists producing work outside of the 'Threadless' paradigm and open things up to a few different styles that haven’t been visited before. I could be way off on this though (I probably haven’t been here long enough). My thinking behind it is that the initial investment of $2k was narrowing the selection of work that Threadless were prepared to bring to market. In turn it was probably knowingly or unknowingly making artists create work with a certain aesthetic that they deemed worthy of fitting in with the general look of pre-existing products. This is quite inhibiting when you think about it. Without this $2k ‘risk’ in play as much anymore it might bring a lot of fresh work being submitted and eventually going into production. This is by no means a poke at previously chosen designs. A lot of the work is absolutely brilliant and much better than what I can do.

With regards to tips, if I ever am lucky enough to have a print and receive a tip, I’ll be very pleased. The sentiment from the person giving the tip will probably be that the shirt they’ve just bought will make them very happy and they appreciate the time you’ve put into it. Let’s be honest $25 for a shirt is cheap anyway these days, especially for a quality design. Sorry for the essay, hopefully this doesn’t come across too much like the ramblings of a mad man. For most of you that don’t know me, I’m Mat, nice to meet you!

Page:
  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9
  10. ... 20
No account?
Join Us