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Some feedback please

Hi, I would appreciate some feedback on an idea I'm working on.
Truthfully most of my designs up until now are more like sketches because I usually don't have or take the time to finish them properly. Also, I'm not a graphic designer or illustrator so that's more easily said than done :)


I'd love to get some tips, thanks.


Watch this
Trashcancomic

I think the idea is great. It's got a lot of potential. I would make the windows transparent (if they aren't already I'm not sure from my screen).

The heart is too front and center, I think about the placement and scale compared to the submarine. maybe give the submarine some context. kinda feels like its floating in air right now

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

Since you're not a designer or an illustrator I'll say only these few things. I wouldn't go around openly admitting that you're not willing to put the time in to finish your work to the best standard possible. It really of begs the question, if you don't have a habit of putting in the time to do the work, why would anyone put the time in to giving you any advice?

That being said, this looks like clip art. And the reason it looks like clip art, is because it is. You didn't create this in any meaningful sense, other than copy and paste two pieces of downloaded imagery together.

I'm sorry, but this sort of thing just doesn't cut it here. This is the big boy game.

taz-pie

epic fail

hatsikidee

@ trashcancomic Thank you, I'll definitely think about it

@ melmike I ment that up until now I haven't taken the time to try to finish my designs because I got stuck. I'm an interactive art professional, but these are my first attempts at printed matter. I've posted this one because I do want to try to develop it.

You're absolutely right about the meaningful sense remark. In my profession the concept dictates the visuals and I've tried that with a few other 'designs'. With this one I tried not to take a rational approach, but just to create something cute I guess.

Personally I do think it has potential, but on a whole other level than some top designers that are active on Threadless. I didn't get an account to showcase my talent, but to experiment and hopefully get feedback and get better.

You're also right about the clipart - I'm just learning to use illustrator and before losing myself in working on both an idea and the visual style I (for now at least) combine different stuff to get an idea of the direction I want to go.

Thank you for taking the time to comment. If more people do I might get to play with the big boys in a few years ;)

@ taz-pie Failures are finger posts on the road to achievement ;)

Trashcancomic

Oooh. Clipart eh. Yeah, I mean, some advice that helped me was if I'm going to take anything (this was specific to font) go over it with pencil or something to "make it my own" that way its not essentially...stealing. you can kind of work around that. But don't use clipart.

also don't mess with taz-pie...

aqsmorningview
Trashcancomic said:

Oooh. Clipart eh. Yeah, I mean, some advice that helped me was if I'm going to take anything (this was specific to font) go over it with pencil or something to "make it my own" that way its not essentially...stealing. you can kind of work around that. But don't use clipart.

also don't mess with taz-pie...

so your saying if I traced someone elses art its now my own?

hatsikidee

My background is in fine art (master's degree) so I understand the notion of not passing someone elses art as your own :)

But - just for the h*ll of it - what about ready-mades, assemblages, sampling etc. To me the combination of the two objects is a nice image, wether I designed them seperately or not. I do appreciate people drawing or designing by hand, but is it compulsory? And where do you draw the line - no pun intended :) I'm sure designers use pre-designed digital brushes, filters etc. or minimally change existing designs (i even saw a few in the shop).

My latest t-shirt is a parody on 'I can't believe it's not butter', is that worthy of a threadless tshirt? Apparently so. Not my design, but - to me at least - funny. Truth be told, I would love to be able to design every little detail myself - but for now I can't :)

Trashcancomic

Well no. which is why I put that in "quotation marks" because it's similar to making it your own. like a music cover or parody that uses the same exact music note for note, except lowering the whole song by a half note. Because you are re-recording it and changing it slightly it becomes "your own". Is it copying? yes. It happens all the time. I mean look at half the designs that get printed on this site...tell me all of them are original and nobody ever traced anything.

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

Theres a stark difference between parody/ reinterpretation and clip art. Even the most pedantic person can see that. If you're a professional in a creative industry then surely you must understand this. You can dress up what you did with a thousand explanations but the bottom line is that you've basically directly copied something and tried to pass it off as your own. The concept is weak and there is no illustration.

If you want to 'play with the big boys' as you put it, then put in some effort. Why would you come half arsed and expect help, if you can't be bothered then why should we?

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

Okay, I take your point that you haven't known how to 'finish' some of your tee designs because you're new to tee design.

What I don't understand however is someone with a master's degree in fine art taking two utterly uninteresting pieces of clip-art and using them as a starting point for their work. It's not saying anything, it's not ironic, it's not controversial, unique or even pleasant to look at.

When I said 'big boy game', what I meant was this is a place for people who take art seriously (in the sense that whatever it is they do, it's important to them personally), which is what has me a little confused, because clearly you do take art seriously.

Most of the time, people who come along here and do this kind of clip-art arranging are usually kids with absolutely no understanding of design or art. They just like the idea of having something sold on a tee on a famous website, and think it's a good way to make an easy buck.

No one's saying that you have to be an amazing illustrator, or that you can't used pre-existing elements in your work. The Threadless community is open to all kinds of designs. What it isn't open to is half-arsery, laziness, drudgery and simple cut-and-paste jobs.

The people who vote on this site and the people who pull the strings, they want to see original thoughts, imagination and artists pushing their talents and t-shirt design to their utmost boundaries.

Lastly, because you brought up the ready-mades, I'd like to talk about Duchamp. I've had many similar discussions to the one you're starting, (about the nature of how much an artist needs to complete their work by hand for it to be considered art), and in almost all of them someone brings up the ready-mades. The argument is often used as a kind of artistic precedent, but the one things that's almost always left out is historical context.

When Duchamp walked into that exhibition with a urinal and signed it, he was already a famous artist, and he was making a very important statement for that specific place and time, that needed to be said. Then and there, he was questioning what art means, and just as importantly, what it means to be a famous artist. The piece itself was inconsequential, the art was the discussion that followed.

What he wasn't doing was giving an excuse for every artist and student from that point on to simply take what others had done, sign it, and pass it off as their own without making any new and meaningful statement or contribution.

So in the light of all this, which has to be one of the longest posts ever, I think that no, this submarine attached a love heart is not any good, and you should just move on to something else.

The I can't believe it's not better one, however, is funny. It made me chuckle. Off to vote on it now.

Trashcancomic

Well said. Not sure if what I was communicating was along those lines but if it wasn't...that was a better explanation than I could have given. My Comment about "copying" and "making it your own" was simply to highlight that it happens all too often...not that it's ok to do

hatsikidee

I understand where you guys are coming from :) I probably should have put a lot more work in it before I posted it (or move on indeed). My only point is that theoretically with the right amount of talent and time an original work can be created of existing pieces - clipart in this case. Did I do that? No. Will I? Who knows.

Like I said before, the stuff I posted are some first attempts in a field I'm not familiar with. I know it sucks compared to people who master it :) I didn't join to showcase anything but out of interest. And being who I am I can't just browse and judge, I have to try stuff myself. I'll just try harder before I'll ask for some pointers again ;)

hatsikidee

Btw it was supposed to be a heart shaped hot air balloon :P

hellofromthemoon
hellofromthemoon profile pic Alumni

If you're a fine arts major perhaps you should try submitting some fine arts T-shirt designs. Check out the recent drawing challenge, most of those were hand-drawn with minimal photoshop.

TonyAlanCooper
hellofromthemoon said:

If you're a fine arts major perhaps you should try submitting some fine arts T-shirt designs. Check out the recent drawing challenge, most of those were hand-drawn with minimal photoshop.

I have to step in here and point out that hatsikidee has a masters, which is a post grad degree. As I understand it, a 'Major' is an undergraduate degree. ;) Sorry to be pedantic.

Also, as a Fine Art graduate myself (1999), I'm not sure I would like or want to submit fine art material for mass print for several reasons, one of them being that it targets a mass audience which often prefers pop culture rather than high culture. Secondly, fine art is preferably not reproduced, at least not before the original work gains recognition. I'm not sure how hatsikidee feels about this. But for me, Fine Art is a different kettle-of-fish and most designs I have seen printed on t-shirts would not be considered Fine Art. I could be proven wrong, and for my own sake I hope I am wrong, because then I could submit some of my own works, but I don't think Threadless or its customers are looking for Fine Art.

One last thing, being able to draw and paint is a small part of art and especially fine art. Although it certainly helps, it's not ability that makes an artist, but their vision and execution. Many fine artists use digital tools alongside traditional ones. I'm one of them.

And to the op, I recommend following tutorial after tutorial on Illustrator, etc. until it's second nature to you. Then your ideas won't be hampered by the digital process. Good luck. ;)

taz-pie
TonyAlanCooper said:
hellofromthemoon said:

If you're a fine arts major perhaps you should try submitting some fine arts T-shirt designs. Check out the recent drawing challenge, most of those were hand-drawn with minimal photoshop.

I have to step in here and point out that hatsikidee has a masters, which is a post grad degree. As I understand it, a 'Major' is an undergraduate degree. ;) Sorry to be pedantic.

Also, as a Fine Art graduate myself (1999), I'm not sure I would like or want to submit fine art material for mass print for several reasons, one of them being that it targets a mass audience which often prefers pop culture rather than high culture. Secondly, fine art is preferably not reproduced, at least not before the original work gains recognition. I'm not sure how hatsikidee feels about this. But for me, Fine Art is a different kettle-of-fish and most designs I have seen printed on t-shirts would not be considered Fine Art. I could be proven wrong, and for my own sake I hope I am wrong, because then I could submit some of my own works, but I don't think Threadless or its customers are looking for Fine Art.

One last thing, being able to draw and paint is a small part of art and especially fine art. Although it certainly helps, it's not ability that makes an artist, but their vision and execution. Many fine artists use digital tools alongside traditional ones. I'm one of them.

And to the op, I recommend following tutorial after tutorial on Illustrator, etc. until it's second nature to you. Then your ideas won't be hampered by the digital process. Good luck. ;)

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni
1 design submitted -

I'm a farts major and I draw happy dick gifs

taz-pie

also this:

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni
TonyAlanCooper said:
hellofromthemoon said:

If you're a fine arts major perhaps you should try submitting some fine arts T-shirt designs. Check out the recent drawing challenge, most of those were hand-drawn with minimal photoshop.

I have to step in here and point out that hatsikidee has a masters, which is a post grad degree. As I understand it, a 'Major' is an undergraduate degree. ;) Sorry to be pedantic.

Also, as a Fine Art graduate myself (1999), I'm not sure I would like or want to submit fine art material for mass print for several reasons, one of them being that it targets a mass audience which often prefers pop culture rather than high culture. Secondly, fine art is preferably not reproduced, at least not before the original work gains recognition. I'm not sure how hatsikidee feels about this. But for me, Fine Art is a different kettle-of-fish and most designs I have seen printed on t-shirts would not be considered Fine Art. I could be proven wrong, and for my own sake I hope I am wrong, because then I could submit some of my own works, but I don't think Threadless or its customers are looking for Fine Art.

One last thing, being able to draw and paint is a small part of art and especially fine art. Although it certainly helps, it's not ability that makes an artist, but their vision and execution. Many fine artists use digital tools alongside traditional ones. I'm one of them.

And to the op, I recommend following tutorial after tutorial on Illustrator, etc. until it's second nature to you. Then your ideas won't be hampered by the digital process. Good luck. ;)

You guys are fine arts grads, so you might disagree, but isn't this concept of 'fine art' more or less obsolete these days? Well, it serves a purpose for universities, but in the real world, since at least post-modernism landed, the separation between the so-called 'fine' and 'applied' arts has mixed to the point that it kind of disappears. On one side you've got art critics and old organisations deciding for the rest of us what is and isn't art, and street artists doing their own thing on the other, and in the middle countless unknowns doing whatever they're doing for a myriad of reasons. If fine art is supposed to be art for art's sake, then it must necessarily describe a lot of what is going on here at threadless. Not everything, but a lot.

Also, threadless prints plenty of work which could easily have otherwise been considered fine art.

TonyAlanCooper
melmike said:
TonyAlanCooper said:
hellofromthemoon said:

If you're a fine arts major perhaps you should try submitting some fine arts T-shirt designs. Check out the recent drawing challenge, most of those were hand-drawn with minimal photoshop.

I have to step in here and point out that hatsikidee has a masters, which is a post grad degree. As I understand it, a 'Major' is an undergraduate degree. ;) Sorry to be pedantic.

Also, as a Fine Art graduate myself (1999), I'm not sure I would like or want to submit fine art material for mass print for several reasons, one of them being that it targets a mass audience which often prefers pop culture rather than high culture. Secondly, fine art is preferably not reproduced, at least not before the original work gains recognition. I'm not sure how hatsikidee feels about this. But for me, Fine Art is a different kettle-of-fish and most designs I have seen printed on t-shirts would not be considered Fine Art. I could be proven wrong, and for my own sake I hope I am wrong, because then I could submit some of my own works, but I don't think Threadless or its customers are looking for Fine Art.

One last thing, being able to draw and paint is a small part of art and especially fine art. Although it certainly helps, it's not ability that makes an artist, but their vision and execution. Many fine artists use digital tools alongside traditional ones. I'm one of them.

And to the op, I recommend following tutorial after tutorial on Illustrator, etc. until it's second nature to you. Then your ideas won't be hampered by the digital process. Good luck. ;)

You guys are fine arts grads, so you might disagree, but isn't this concept of 'fine art' more or less obsolete these days? Well, it serves a purpose for universities, but in the real world, since at least post-modernism landed, the separation between the so-called 'fine' and 'applied' arts has mixed to the point that it kind of disappears. On one side you've got art critics and old organisations deciding for the rest of us what is and isn't art, and street artists doing their own thing on the other, and in the middle countless unknowns doing whatever they're doing for a myriad of reasons. If fine art is supposed to be art for art's sake, then it must necessarily describe a lot of what is going on here at threadless. Not everything, but a lot.

Also, threadless prints plenty of work which could easily have otherwise been considered fine art.

Thank you for engaging in a mature discussion melmike. I'm glad you chose to use words instead of a gif. ;)

I'm not an expert on fine and applied arts, by any means. I just have my own personal views on it and tend to have a mental separation when it comes to art which is lead by my own interests and that which is lead by commercial application and a client brief.

Although the distinction between fine and applied arts may be be so 'fine' as to become philosophical, 'rather than black and white', I still believe there are some intrinsic differences, particularly in the process and the execution of both. I am not saying that one is "better" than the other. I just state that they are very different forms of art. There are overlaps, of course, and that these overlaps are utilised by artists in both disciplines.

If you take a look at some University prospectuses for applied and fine art degrees, although there will be a core overlap, the direction and focus of study are often disparate.

I'm the first to criticise the field of fine art, especially for the elitist critics who, as you rightly say, decide what is 'good' art. I have often struggled to come to terms with this intellectually, as I'm torn between two opposing views.

Here is a quote on the distinction we are discussing, which may offer some food for thought.

Fine Art the briefs tend to be open-ended and artist-led, whereas Applied Arts projects are modelled as client-focused design briefs.

If you take this site for example, most people submit in the hope of getting printed and will often 'compromise' their design to fit the Threadless mould. Some will, some won't. This is way of working is not consistent with the fine art model.

Saying that, I'm sure many, many designs submitted on Threadless would match this description. I'm sure that many artists here produce self-led work which could easily be classed as fine art. As to what Threadless prints as we speak, I haven't seen every submission, but most of what I have seen tends to borrow the same themes and styles. Even if we could all agree that it is art, would we all be able to agree that it's good art? ;)

I agree with you about post-post-modernisms effect on the arts. Andy Warhol & pop art, et al, explored this effect very well.

melmike, thank you for being polite and professional. I appreciate your views. Many thanks.

TAC

taz-pie

i am pretty sure i was also engaging in a mature discussion.

taz-pie

also, i would wear this gif if i could:

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

I broadly agree with you in terms of the definitions between Fine Art and Applied Arts. However I find Fine art to be an industry that is a self propelling one, in that its an 'Emperors New Clothes' scenario half the time. If you have a good agent or gallery behind you then its good art, if you're a nobody then you suck. In many ways it is a self fulfilling prophecy and a terribly insular and incestuous business. I also have very little time for fine art, I find it fantastically elitist, coded, pretentious and usually lacking in technical skill. I studied fine art for many years and have quite a few Fine Art friends and have sighed my way through many a private viewing.

Industries such as Illustration and design have a distinct and open method of gauging success. It is typically accessible artwork that is in a public arena and lives and dies by its conceptual and technical merits on the basis of whether consumers or clients like on an immediate and intuitive level. If you ask an illustrator or designer why they created a piece of work, their intentions, process and conclusions you will usually receive a straight and comprehensible answer. The same cannot be said of Fine Artists a lot of the time.

Naturally in post-modern terms there are cross overs and blurred lines but by and large I find these are the distinction.

I would dispute the notion of creating for a monetary return. There isn't a creative alive that doesn't want their work to be seen, appreciated and bought, its that simple. Regardless of the other definitions both sides want to be rewarded for their time and effort.

hellofromthemoon
hellofromthemoon profile pic Alumni
Secondly, fine art is preferably not reproduced, at least not before the original work gains recognition.

This is such an alien concept to me. I feel like nowadays so much of the recognition for art stems from the internet, and people seeing your things all over the world from their computer. Do you consider an online portfolio to be reproduction?

I'm not trying to attack fine art or anything here, I am honestly curious. I'm a molecular biology student so I've never been a part of the art culture at studios or universities.

TonyAlanCooper
hellofromthemoon said:
Secondly, fine art is preferably not reproduced, at least not before the original work gains recognition.

This is such an alien concept to me. I feel like nowadays so much of the recognition for art stems from the internet, and people seeing your things all over the world from their computer. Do you consider an online portfolio to be reproduction?

I'm not trying to attack fine art or anything here, I am honestly curious. I'm a molecular biology student so I've never been a part of the art culture at studios or universities.

No, I don't consider an online portfolio reproduction. As an example, the Mona Lisa can be reproduced, but there is still only one art work that can be owned of it. It can be reproduced in books, on posters, etc. etc. as merchandise, but that merchandise references the original art work. The reproduction is not the original artwork. What we do here is create a design with the intent of it being reproduced as many times as we could hope for. There wouldn't necessarily be an 'original' as such. The Mona Lisa cannot be reproduced in all forms, however, as that could constitute fraud. So, there's reproduction based upon an original design or illustration and then there's reproduction based upon a singular piece of art and it merely references the original. It doesn't try to imitate it. A photo of a painting online is a reference of the original and cannot be sold as if it was the original.

Also, art is such a broad term. Fine art is a particular field and practice, so when people say 'art', they could mean many forms, music, dance, painting, etc.

Yes, there a many artists who gain recognition online, but are they selling one-off pieces (this increases value) or something that they intend to be reproduced so that each reproduction isn't distinct or unique from any other (this decreases value and desireability. Much art is about status, so there is certainly a lot of pomp).

Many thanks for your comments.

TAC

TonyAlanCooper
taz-pie said:

i am pretty sure i was also engaging in a mature discussion.

Lol. Yes, you were. Thank you gif girl. ;)

TonyAlanCooper
Wharton said:

I would dispute the notion of creating for a monetary return. There isn't a creative alive that doesn't want their work to be seen, appreciated and bought, its that simple. Regardless of the other definitions both sides want to be rewarded for their time and effort.

I'm confused. Did I give you the impression that fine artists don't seek monetary return? :S

TonyAlanCooper

I don't want to get into a debate about whether Fine Art is better than Applied Arts, or visa versa. I merely commented that they were different fields and that submitting fine art to Threadless wasn't, in my opinion, the best avenue follow.

Just to clarify, I didn't wish anybody to be offended or to feel like I was taking a superior stance just because I studied Fine Art. I wasn't.

I'll leave you with this final thought: in the field of music, the worst is often the most popular? Why? Maybe because it's formulaic and easy to engage with. As a lot of popular music knows what sells and what doesn't, they attain a common sound and production value. Is it good music? I think many people would say 'no', but it still sells in the millions. Does popular equal better? And will something that is successful today remain successful in fifty, or 10, or 5 years even? A great work of art is forever. A great design may only be just for now, especially if other designers start to replicate the success and popularity of a design. I'm not saying one is better than the other. Just different aims and outcomes. ;)

Best wishes.

TAC

TonyAlanCooper

I don't want to get into a debate about whether Fine Art is better than Applied Arts, or visa versa. I merely commented that they were different fields and that submitting fine art to Threadless wasn't, in my opinion, the best avenue to follow.

Just to clarify, I didn't wish anybody to be offended or to feel like I was taking a superior stance just because I studied Fine Art. I wasn't.

I'll leave you with this final thought: in the field of music, the worst is often the most popular? Why? Maybe because it's formulaic and easy to engage with. As a lot of popular music knows what sells and what doesn't, they attain a common sound and production value. Is it good music? I think many people would say 'no', but it still sells in the millions. Does popular equal better? And will something that is successful today remain successful in fifty, or 10, or 5 years even? A great work of art is forever. A great design may only be just for now, especially if other designers start to replicate the success and popularity of a design. I'm not saying one is better than the other. Just different aims and outcomes. ;)

Best wishes.

TAC

FoodStampDavis
FoodStampDavis profile pic Alumni

I'm super stoked I dropped out of college.

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

I think you can look at many aspects of applied arts and see that it has stood the test of time. Think of 50's illustration, which is full of wit and charm. Even the work used for advertising is still popular and used as decoration and artwork in homes. Ercol furniture is timeless and just as popular today as it was when first made. In fact its probably more ubiquitous and appreciated than many pieces of contemporary art.

I also think theres a clear distinction between whats considered traditional art and contemporary art, time will tell on contemporary art as to whether its stands the test of time, going back to what I was saying before it will have a home amongst the elite few, but less so for its technical and artistic merits but more so for what it offers in terms of distinction between classes or aspiration of moving classes. It provides a badge of honour to be amongst the privileged admitting them to an elitist 'fine art club'.

I believe that artwork should touch people on an immediate level encouraging participation and enjoyment. I'm not saying people shouldn't be challenged but neither should they feel alienated or divided. Personally I call bullshit on fine art.

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni
1 design submitted -

Personally I think that drawing arbitrary lines between fine and applied and whatever arts is utterly pointless philosophical wankery that benefits nobody. Artists gonna art, elitists gonna elite blah blah. All art is made for an audience and the value and quality of the art is determined by how the audience you were aiming for receives the art.

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

I stand by my opinion, but you're absolutely right Morkki. Each to their own I guess its like arguing over which genre of music is best.

TonyAlanCooper
Morkki said:

Personally I think that drawing arbitrary lines between fine and applied and whatever arts is utterly pointless philosophical wankery that benefits nobody. Artists gonna art, elitists gonna elite blah blah. All art is made for an audience and the value and quality of the art is determined by how the audience you were aiming for receives the art.

Completely agree.

I think we should end this discussion here now guys. We kidnapped the ops thread and all he was after was feedback. I think we might have scared him off. :P

hatsikidee

Nah I'm still here :)

I've enjoyed reading the comments, but it's a discussion without any ending. I've been teaching at art acedemies and other creative educational institutes for several years now and I've been hearing it over and over. To me it's a silly discussion because the relationship between fine arts and applied arts are well documented. But that's not the point :)

Like you said I was just looking for some feedback. Both the reactions and the discussion led me thinking that I'll have to put a lot more work in the concept and visuals before posting something on the forum. I was just trying stuff and thinking out loud. Clearly there are some great artist active on this site and that's great.

It got me thinking about something else though. There's a huge collection of vintage designs in the public domain. Some of them are really awesome I think. Legally there aren't any issues to print them so - if they make great tshirts - Threadless couldn't care less. Right? To me it actually has a nice ring to it - not to make money, just the idea of printing them for a creative community and giving them a second life. Is something like this worth thinking about (maybe as a project or something) or shouldn't be it on threadless at all? Just wondering :)

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

I think appropriating old images isn't strictly a bad thing, its not exactly in the spirit of Threadless. I think the site is about creating original and innovative work.

Also an old French advert probably doesn't have a great deal of resonance with a contemporary market. I like the style, but other than that what else is it delivering?

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

stylistically, that stuff has huge potential, but I think you've got to put your own spin on it. For example, some horn tooting.... I collaged a dozen commons engravings, mixed with my own illustration and colouring, to make a homage to Moby Dick...

But I take Wharton's point. I wouldn't want to only do this kind of thing.

Morkki
Morkki profile pic Alumni
1 design submitted -

Legally there aren't any issues to print them so - if they make great tshirts - Threadless couldn't care less. Right? To me it actually has a nice ring to it - not to make money, just the idea of printing them for a creative community and giving them a second life. Is something like this worth thinking about (maybe as a project or something) or shouldn't be it on threadless at all?

Legally, no. But a major thing about Threadless is crediting the artists so if you were to sub them who would they actually credit? The old advert graphic style is great so why not be inspired it, instead of just appropriating it?

hatsikidee

Yeah I guess that makes sense. Thanks guys, see you later.

galehaut
hatsikidee said:

Yeah I guess that makes sense. Thanks guys, see you later.

Don't leave. Everyone starts out not so great, and the ones the stick around and put in some effort get a lot better.

hatsikidee

Oh, I'm not going anywhere :)

I'm learning the fundamentals of illustrator now and am working on some first doodles. But in the meantime i couldn't resist to upload this one. Sorry guys ;)

hatsikidee

Adapted the silhouette to a character and added some stuff. Good practice for me. I'm now trying to work on something weekly. Baring in mind it's one of my first illustrations ever, I'm curious what you guys think :)

I'll probably regret this, but it's up for voting. I gave it a 3 :) https://www.threadless.com/designs/dream-tee

dineshpnf
Trashcancomic said:

I think the idea is great. It's got a lot of potential. I would make the windows transparent (if they aren't already I'm not sure from my screen).

The heart is too front and center, I think about the placement and scale compared to the submarine. maybe give the submarine some context. kinda feels like its floating in air right now

:P

No account?