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First time in years I've bought a tee!

I wont bore you with the details but the last two years have been tough, I was incredibly broke, the first year I was working but wasnt breaking even, the second I was unemployed.


I've finally got a job and I'm living in a place where I can actually save money.


So buying a new tee shirt was a big deal for me.


p.s I got Zombie Donut


https://www.threadless.com/product/5576/Zombie_Donut

Watch this
vanillablue
vanillablue profile pic Staff

Yay! It always feels good to make a fun purchase when you've gotten all caught up with money stuff.

PeculiarTiffany
PeculiarTiffany profile pic Alumni
1 design submitted -

Congrats on getting things together enough to be able to comfortably make a tee purchase.

:-) Life is rough sometimes, glad to see that you're doing well.

chuck p comics
chuck p comics profile pic Alumni

cool, I just bought hiding from alex yesterday

jeffreyg
jeffreyg profile pic Staff

woohoo! (:

stubby43

Thank you, I wouldn't say I'm doing well, more like I've restarted. I'm finally in a position where I can get the life I want instead of just settling for one that made me miserable.

For the first time in a long time things are looking up, I feel like I have the power to change my life which was something I lost for a while.

melmike
melmike profile pic Alumni

Great to hear you're back on you're feet. Sounds like you were in the same boat I was year and half ago. Flat broke, couldn't find a job… Threadless actually played a huge part in re-energising my creativity. May this be the first new tee of many… great pick btw!

The Paper Crane
The Paper Crane profile pic Alumni
2 designs submitted - Score now!

Yay stubby! Sorry that things have not been good. Here's to your brighter present and future.

stubby43

Melmike, yeah I had this overall plan of how I wanted my life to turn out but then I just had set back after set back after set back.

I reached a point where I felt like I couldn't pick myself up and dust myself off again, being unemployed sucked but it was a lot better than when I was working, living in london in a tiny room with a mouse problem, always trying to cut back my spending but always spending more than I earnt.

I mean at the time I was trying to build a career in the media but I was so broke I couldn't afford to do it.

Made even more painful because I was working at a shop that specialised in serving the top 1%, watching them spend more than you make in a year in five minutes was a bitter pill I struggled to swallow.

So going back home was the right decision, the problem was there wasn't a lot of jobs around so finding work was tough. Getting rejected from jobs I was over qualified for was also extremely difficult to deal with.

So I'm very glad to be working again, even if its not what I want its given me a new lease on life.

Rick thank you!

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

London is a tough place to live when you're starting out and what with the economy the way it is, media and arts jobs are some of the first to get cut back. I freelance in London and its super difficult, I just make enough to get by, luckily my girlfriend has a pretty good job so she very gracious can cover the tough times. you used to work in Harrods right? I have a friend that works in the buyers department and he used to tell me tales of the disgusting wealth (Sheikhs chartering private jets to deliver a box of doughnuts to their children in the middle east) I can only imagine how gauling it that was to work there. The divide between rich and poor has never been so great.

Anyway, sounds like a smart move to move home and regroup and think about what you want, especially if it means you get to buy new T-shirts.

stubby43

Hey Chris hows it going?

Honestly even if I could have afforded to live in London I probably wouldn't have liked it, I prefer smaller cities, london was just overwhelming and I didnt like commuting that level of distance. In smaller cities you get to know the entire place really well and its difficult to get lost e.g if your in york just head to the minster, its the biggest building in the city and you'll be able to find your way home.

That being said, I couldn't afford it, I was paying a lot of money for a room that was probably making me ill and all the media companies wanted unpaid internships working full time. I just couldnt do it, my savings were gone.

As for H arrods its complicated, I worked at the store and had to abide by all of their rules (uniform was really expensive, e.g shoes that met standards cost about £200) but I didnt work for them.

I was employed by another company, if I'd have worked for them I'd have been on something like £10 an hour plus commission and been allocated a £2000 uniform budget so I'd have been earning a living wage.

But I worked for another company who paid just over minimum wage, didn't give us commission and gave us £200 towards our uniform which as I mentioned only covered the shoes.

the company is an odd place, if they like you they will go out of their way to look after you, if you find money on the floor and hand it in after several months you'll get that money to keep, given that most of the people that do drop money are rich tourists you almost always get that money back.

If you do well on a mystery shop you get given £50 in vouchers, they also give you a christmas box that usually contains something like a nice note book, chocolate, biscuits and wine, the value is probably about £100 retail.

And they give you an insane amount of discount, its usually 33% but on shopping days can go up to 43% off purchases.

And the customers can put vouchers on your staff card, it usually happens if you have a regular and they like you.

But if your on their wrong side they will go out of their way to make you life miserable and their not afraid to sack you for the most minor of reasons.

Also being a woman working for there sucks, we were doing a round of interviewing and had hired a girl, she'd passed everything from our point of view but was sent to training (thats what you have to do) and we were told we couldnt hire her because she was too fat, so we didnt.

Women are required to wear make up (its illegal to demand that), failure to do so could get you noticed by the fashion police (cant remember their departments real name) and would get you put on a process, meaning you'd be sent home, wouldnt be allowed to work and would be sent to retraining then would be monitored to make sure you met uniform standards.

Speaking of which, until last year women had to wear high heels, it was since changed and their now allowed to wear flats BUT its worded in such a way that you have to spend an insane amount of money on the shoes so its cheaper to wear high heels.

--

It was just insane and I personally couldnt keep up with the demands (a manager from another department once spotted me leaning on a desk for a split second, when the department was empty, I stopped as soon as he mentioned it, the next day I was called into the managers office and was told I was on a formal report).

As for the tales of wealth, the private jet story is one of my favourites (they tell it in training), basically the story is krispy kreme opened its first store in the UK as a pop up shop in H arrods, a Arab customer wants the doughnuts so they say fine, cept it turns out he's in the middle east.

So instead of saying its not possible they research the organ transplant process and replicate it, for doughnuts and get them to him in a matter of hours.

What makes it worse? They already had Krispy Kreme in their country, he just wanted it from H arrods.

From personal experience? I once had a customer ask where the gold plated tooth brushes were, also in our department we sold a lot of small items, things like book lamps, book marks and electronic dictionaries, they cost about £5 to £10 each.

On a regular basis Arab customers would buy over £500 worth of these items.

Another man looked at the e-reader devices we had about bought 20, he refused to let me demo them to him.

Sometimes seeing that wealth effected me, other times I could shut it off. What really made a difference was whether or not they were nice.

Princess Basma of Jordan is easily one of the nicest people I've ever met, I used to see her on a regular basis and she'd just chat with us even when she wasnt buying anything, she used to invite the assistant manger (who'd been with h arrods since the 80's) to tea a couple of times a year.

She always treated us like people and not everyone does that (that's not really a rich person thing).

Working there was probably one of the more defining points in my life and I still dont know how I feel about it because on the one hand it was a good job and I have a lot of interesting stories from it but on the other hand it was extremely hard, you were under constant pressure and you really couldn't escape the wealth divide, its one thing to know there are rich people out there, its a completely different thing to actually be speaking to them.

Some people love it and are H arrodians for life, I just couldnt do it.

stubby43

But in answer to your question, yeah I think I made the right decision to leave, its just getting to the next step has taken a long time.

I'm feeling a lot better than I was, the future isnt as bleak as it used to be.

quick-brown-fox
quick-brown-fox profile pic Alumni
1 design submitted -

Nice to see you dude and nice to hear your positive news. You back in the shire?

Wharton
Wharton profile pic Alumni

London Is a double edged sword, theres tons of stuff going on, its just whether you have the money/ time/ effort to get around to doing them. You're right about the rent thing too, its insanely expensive, we have a mortgage thats 2/3s of what we were paying in rent, its totally stupid. We're moving out of London in September to our home town in Devon for a year, I think we've might have had enough of London for the time being. Its an awesome place to visit, but it will grind you down if you live there.

Not everyone is smart enough to see when things aren't working out and make a change, sounds like you're doing the right thing.

stubby43

Hey John, I was for a while but we've move to lancashire.

Chris yeah man, I totally get it and you're right its an exciting city and there are free things to do if you put the effort in, its just it never really worked for me, I'm actually really hoping the high speed rail gets built because it means if I ever find work in the city I can commute from here.

Good luck with the move man and I hope everything works out, change is good.

quick-brown-fox
quick-brown-fox profile pic Alumni
1 design submitted -
stubby43 said:

Hey John, I was for a while but we've move to lancashire.

I like Lancashire, when I was a student I lived in Bolton, Preston and St Anne's. Bolton was my favourite, lovely warm people (in the main) and a cracking record shop. I don't get to London as much as I'd like to, but the last time I went from Crewe it took and hour and a half. A far cry away from the four hour trips I took as a kid.

vanillablue
vanillablue profile pic Staff
stubby43 said:

Hey Chris hows it going?

Honestly even if I could have afforded to live in London I probably wouldn't have liked it, I prefer smaller cities, london was just overwhelming and I didnt like commuting that level of distance. In smaller cities you get to know the entire place really well and its difficult to get lost e.g if your in york just head to the minster, its the biggest building in the city and you'll be able to find your way home.

That being said, I couldn't afford it, I was paying a lot of money for a room that was probably making me ill and all the media companies wanted unpaid internships working full time. I just couldnt do it, my savings were gone.

As for H arrods its complicated, I worked at the store and had to abide by all of their rules (uniform was really expensive, e.g shoes that met standards cost about £200) but I didnt work for them.

I was employed by another company, if I'd have worked for them I'd have been on something like £10 an hour plus commission and been allocated a £2000 uniform budget so I'd have been earning a living wage.

But I worked for another company who paid just over minimum wage, didn't give us commission and gave us £200 towards our uniform which as I mentioned only covered the shoes.

the company is an odd place, if they like you they will go out of their way to look after you, if you find money on the floor and hand it in after several months you'll get that money to keep, given that most of the people that do drop money are rich tourists you almost always get that money back.

If you do well on a mystery shop you get given £50 in vouchers, they also give you a christmas box that usually contains something like a nice note book, chocolate, biscuits and wine, the value is probably about £100 retail.

And they give you an insane amount of discount, its usually 33% but on shopping days can go up to 43% off purchases.

And the customers can put vouchers on your staff card, it usually happens if you have a regular and they like you.

But if your on their wrong side they will go out of their way to make you life miserable and their not afraid to sack you for the most minor of reasons.

Also being a woman working for there sucks, we were doing a round of interviewing and had hired a girl, she'd passed everything from our point of view but was sent to training (thats what you have to do) and we were told we couldnt hire her because she was too fat, so we didnt.

Women are required to wear make up (its illegal to demand that), failure to do so could get you noticed by the fashion police (cant remember their departments real name) and would get you put on a process, meaning you'd be sent home, wouldnt be allowed to work and would be sent to retraining then would be monitored to make sure you met uniform standards.

Speaking of which, until last year women had to wear high heels, it was since changed and their now allowed to wear flats BUT its worded in such a way that you have to spend an insane amount of money on the shoes so its cheaper to wear high heels.

--

It was just insane and I personally couldnt keep up with the demands (a manager from another department once spotted me leaning on a desk for a split second, when the department was empty, I stopped as soon as he mentioned it, the next day I was called into the managers office and was told I was on a formal report).

As for the tales of wealth, the private jet story is one of my favourites (they tell it in training), basically the story is krispy kreme opened its first store in the UK as a pop up shop in H arrods, a Arab customer wants the doughnuts so they say fine, cept it turns out he's in the middle east.

So instead of saying its not possible they research the organ transplant process and replicate it, for doughnuts and get them to him in a matter of hours.

What makes it worse? They already had Krispy Kreme in their country, he just wanted it from H arrods.

From personal experience? I once had a customer ask where the gold plated tooth brushes were, also in our department we sold a lot of small items, things like book lamps, book marks and electronic dictionaries, they cost about £5 to £10 each.

On a regular basis Arab customers would buy over £500 worth of these items.

Another man looked at the e-reader devices we had about bought 20, he refused to let me demo them to him.

Sometimes seeing that wealth effected me, other times I could shut it off. What really made a difference was whether or not they were nice.

Princess Basma of Jordan is easily one of the nicest people I've ever met, I used to see her on a regular basis and she'd just chat with us even when she wasnt buying anything, she used to invite the assistant manger (who'd been with h arrods since the 80's) to tea a couple of times a year.

She always treated us like people and not everyone does that (that's not really a rich person thing).

Working there was probably one of the more defining points in my life and I still dont know how I feel about it because on the one hand it was a good job and I have a lot of interesting stories from it but on the other hand it was extremely hard, you were under constant pressure and you really couldn't escape the wealth divide, its one thing to know there are rich people out there, its a completely different thing to actually be speaking to them.

Some people love it and are H arrodians for life, I just couldnt do it.

Wow...

chuck p comics
chuck p comics profile pic Alumni
vanillablue said:
stubby43 said:

Hey Chris hows it going?

Honestly even if I could have afforded to live in London I probably wouldn't have liked it, I prefer smaller cities, london was just overwhelming and I didnt like commuting that level of distance. In smaller cities you get to know the entire place really well and its difficult to get lost e.g if your in york just head to the minster, its the biggest building in the city and you'll be able to find your way home.

That being said, I couldn't afford it, I was paying a lot of money for a room that was probably making me ill and all the media companies wanted unpaid internships working full time. I just couldnt do it, my savings were gone.

As for H arrods its complicated, I worked at the store and had to abide by all of their rules (uniform was really expensive, e.g shoes that met standards cost about £200) but I didnt work for them.

I was employed by another company, if I'd have worked for them I'd have been on something like £10 an hour plus commission and been allocated a £2000 uniform budget so I'd have been earning a living wage.

But I worked for another company who paid just over minimum wage, didn't give us commission and gave us £200 towards our uniform which as I mentioned only covered the shoes.

the company is an odd place, if they like you they will go out of their way to look after you, if you find money on the floor and hand it in after several months you'll get that money to keep, given that most of the people that do drop money are rich tourists you almost always get that money back.

If you do well on a mystery shop you get given £50 in vouchers, they also give you a christmas box that usually contains something like a nice note book, chocolate, biscuits and wine, the value is probably about £100 retail.

And they give you an insane amount of discount, its usually 33% but on shopping days can go up to 43% off purchases.

And the customers can put vouchers on your staff card, it usually happens if you have a regular and they like you.

But if your on their wrong side they will go out of their way to make you life miserable and their not afraid to sack you for the most minor of reasons.

Also being a woman working for there sucks, we were doing a round of interviewing and had hired a girl, she'd passed everything from our point of view but was sent to training (thats what you have to do) and we were told we couldnt hire her because she was too fat, so we didnt.

Women are required to wear make up (its illegal to demand that), failure to do so could get you noticed by the fashion police (cant remember their departments real name) and would get you put on a process, meaning you'd be sent home, wouldnt be allowed to work and would be sent to retraining then would be monitored to make sure you met uniform standards.

Speaking of which, until last year women had to wear high heels, it was since changed and their now allowed to wear flats BUT its worded in such a way that you have to spend an insane amount of money on the shoes so its cheaper to wear high heels.

--

It was just insane and I personally couldnt keep up with the demands (a manager from another department once spotted me leaning on a desk for a split second, when the department was empty, I stopped as soon as he mentioned it, the next day I was called into the managers office and was told I was on a formal report).

As for the tales of wealth, the private jet story is one of my favourites (they tell it in training), basically the story is krispy kreme opened its first store in the UK as a pop up shop in H arrods, a Arab customer wants the doughnuts so they say fine, cept it turns out he's in the middle east.

So instead of saying its not possible they research the organ transplant process and replicate it, for doughnuts and get them to him in a matter of hours.

What makes it worse? They already had Krispy Kreme in their country, he just wanted it from H arrods.

From personal experience? I once had a customer ask where the gold plated tooth brushes were, also in our department we sold a lot of small items, things like book lamps, book marks and electronic dictionaries, they cost about £5 to £10 each.

On a regular basis Arab customers would buy over £500 worth of these items.

Another man looked at the e-reader devices we had about bought 20, he refused to let me demo them to him.

Sometimes seeing that wealth effected me, other times I could shut it off. What really made a difference was whether or not they were nice.

Princess Basma of Jordan is easily one of the nicest people I've ever met, I used to see her on a regular basis and she'd just chat with us even when she wasnt buying anything, she used to invite the assistant manger (who'd been with h arrods since the 80's) to tea a couple of times a year.

She always treated us like people and not everyone does that (that's not really a rich person thing).

Working there was probably one of the more defining points in my life and I still dont know how I feel about it because on the one hand it was a good job and I have a lot of interesting stories from it but on the other hand it was extremely hard, you were under constant pressure and you really couldn't escape the wealth divide, its one thing to know there are rich people out there, its a completely different thing to actually be speaking to them.

Some people love it and are H arrodians for life, I just couldnt do it.

Wow...

dang

stubby43
quick-brown-fox said:
stubby43 said:

Hey John, I was for a while but we've move to lancashire.

I like Lancashire, when I was a student I lived in Bolton, Preston and St Anne's. Bolton was my favourite, lovely warm people (in the main) and a cracking record shop. I don't get to London as much as I'd like to, but the last time I went from Crewe it took and hour and a half. A far cry away from the four hour trips I took as a kid.

Yeah man my families from the wigan area, I travel into manchester 4 times a week, I go through bolton everyday but I only see the station, whats worth visiting? The only thing I know about Bolton is Peter Kay.

As for london I want to make the trip down to visit, I have a lot of friends down there but you know money.

--

vanillablue, chuck p comics yeah it was a pretty intense experience, but at the time it all sort of became normal, its only after leaving I've been able to step back and say yeah that was crazy.

I mean one of the perks of the job was celebrity spotting, if a famous person is popping into London they almost always make the trip to H arrods, but the reason why their so successful at attracting famous people is because of the effort they put in to making them feel normal or providing them protection.

If you're interacting with a celebrity you are under no circumstances allowed to acknowledge they are famous, the interactions have to be based on normal interactions you'd have with a non famous customer, so its literally just talking product.

Failure to do so could lead to dismissal.

One of my most distinct memories is seeing Rupert Grint.

We'd just opened up a harry potter shop that was promoting the opening of the Harry Potter Studio Tour at Leavesden.

The shop was done up to look like a room from hogwarts, it had amazing merchandise and props from the film, the staff were even dressed up as students.

It was absolutely amazing, I'd pop in on my break to look at the merchandise I wasn't going to buy (though I did buy a raven claw tie).

My department was right next to it with a door way leading through, well Grint was walking through and wanted a look at the store but was more than understandably scared to go in. Fans were travelling from all over the world just go see that shop, I'd spoken to more that a few Americans that had come over just to see it, so going in would have been pretty much him going into the lions den.

I watched him for about 5 minutes stand outside the doorway watching the room before deciding to leave before he was noticed.

So there was a large group of fans, buying all of the products, buying the books who had absolutely no idea that Ron Weasley was watching them.

--

In no other job I'd have stories like that, I just wish I hadnt burnt out and could afford to carry on.

vanillablue
vanillablue profile pic Staff

That is a great story. Everything I hear about him makes me like him more. He seems very down to earth.

stubby43

Well you know he submits to threadless, he revealed it in an interview last year, does it anomalously because he wants to prove that he's talented and not because of his fame.

found the interview

quick-brown-fox
quick-brown-fox profile pic Alumni
1 design submitted -
stubby43 said:
quick-brown-fox said:
stubby43 said:

Hey John, I was for a while but we've move to lancashire.

Yeah man my families from the wigan area, I travel into manchester 4 times a week, I go through bolton everyday but I only see the station, whats worth visiting? The only thing I know about Bolton is Peter Kay.

It's been such a long time since I was there, spent some mad days in the park during the summer, there was a really nice butterfly park there. This was an awesome record shop, glad to see it's still there. http://www.xrecords.co.uk If you like walking and have got access to a car, this place is pretty nice on a warm spring day. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rivington_Pike

I think I have rose tinted glasses towards Bolton, but it's definitely worth a wonder around.

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