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Technique Sharing

I think we should share what we've been learning lately, as I often find techniques and styles in the community that I wonder how they are achieved. My most recent learnings in Photoshop and Illustrator are Gradient Map and the Blend tool.


in photoshop simply go Image > Adjustments > Gradient map, and your foregroud / background color are mapped accordingly. Very nice and simple results.




The Blend Tool


Have both objects selected. go, Objects > Blend > Blend Options >Specified steps> desired number


Select the objects again, go Object > Blend > Make. You can also move the anchor points around to make them overlap!




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melmike

These last few weeks I've been experimenting with pixelation techniques and pattern dithers in photoshop. I've been creating pixels in tiny photoshop files, then importing those raster images into Illustrator where I can blow them up without loss of the effect... then I open the .ai file in photoshop at the new large size. It's the only way I've found to be able to make the pixels bigger without an anti-aliasing effect. Maybe someone know a better method.

Morkki

Simple way to make big pixels: set your scaling interpolation to Nearest Neighbor and then scale at exactly 100% increments: scaling up to 200% turns one pixel into a 2x2 pixel block for example.

melmike
Morkki said:

Simple way to make big pixels: set your scaling interpolation to Nearest Neighbor and then scale at exactly 100% increments: scaling up to 200% turns one pixel into a 2x2 pixel block for example.

THANKS! Although, after this one I'm working on I think I'll steer clear of pixel art for a while.

Evancooleo

bumpage! Thanks for sharing techniques guys

Evancooleo

bump for knowledge

Evancooleo

sharing is caring

Daviisilva

awesome blog - wish I knew a trick to share, I think I only know the basics in my PS

Evancooleo

anyone got anything?

tatilus

if you must use this technique in Photoshop, I swear it's magic:

1: Make an empty layer above all other layers. 2: Ctrl+Shift+Alt+E 3: Boom you get all the visible layers into 1 single layer (with out effecting any other layers)

you are welcome

RonanL

Not so much a craft technique, but more of a mental one I find especially helpful for submitting to Threadless -

Always wait atleast a day to submit something once you are 'done' with it.

Everything that you make looks good the second you feel done with it, and you may be giddy to submit it right away. But putting it aside for a while and doing something else, you can come back to a fresh perspective and see blatant problems very quickly. I find doing this to be one of the most helpful and important processes in making anything, and I'm glad I started doing it.

Evancooleo
Ronami said:

Not so much a craft technique, but more of a mental one I find especially helpful for submitting to Threadless -

Always wait atleast a day to submit something once you are 'done' with it.

Everything that you make looks good the second you feel done with it, and you may be giddy to submit it right away. But putting it aside for a while and doing something else, you can come back to a fresh perspective and see blatant problems very quickly. I find doing this to be one of the most helpful and important processes in making anything, and I'm glad I started doing it.

Dude. Thank you for sharing this, I've been gettin in the habit of this for my last 5 or so submissions, and my score has reflected it. Those last minute changes after a days worth of clearing your head can not be overlooked.

RonanL

For sure. People have different habits when they work, but I feel this one is particularly useful for everyone. The design always benefits. Maybe you overworked something and made some cuts, maybe you picked better color than before, maybe you completely revamped the design. Waiting and seeing things with a fresher, newer perspective is a technique you can apply to all sorts of different things in life.

Another thing I do (especially more often) is to perform a mental critique at the beginning and end of each design. I simply ask myself, "Would people wear this? What's the wearability of this design? Does it look good on a person?" I think the wearability of a design is the most important thing in designing for Threadless. The internet today is SWAMPED with cool illustrations and designs on shirts. However, there's something about them that just seems cheap. It's the fact that they just wouldn't look good out in the world. They have very little wearability to most people. I'm looking at sites like TeeFury, who publish hoards of pop-culture inspired jokes and mashups.

To me, though, they simply don't look good on a person. They're designs and illustrations that I think are best left on the web. Who needs a mashup shirt between Disney's Frozen and Game of Thrones? What do those things have to do with each other? They both have snow? The shirt exists just to say, "Get it??", but why does a shirt design need to be "gotten"? Oooo - don't get me started on Dr. Who mashup designs.

I'm not saying that pop culture designs are a bad thing, but I think that a simple joke itself isn't enough to carry an uninspired and lame design that really has no reason to be on a shirt other than becoming a walking comic. This is where I think Threadless really pulls ahead of other graphic tee sites - they print a large collection designs that accessible and wearable to many people. So that's what I ask myself when I'm designing for Threadless - does the design simply look good on a person?

mike bautista
1 design submitted - Score now!

I use layer masks and clippings masks a lot.

a layer mask can be activated by clicking the layer mask button (it's a square with the circle in the middle, right of the effects button). the mask allows you to erase parts of the layer but it works both ways. black erases and white fills. it doesn't add to the layer, just works with whatever is already on it. it was convenient in my Arnold design. I drew in the basic shapes of the feathers and then used the mask to define the shape more where the feathers split and ruffled. this mask is also helpful for me since I work with limited colors and try to keep a color to each layer. I put the lighter layers on the bottom and work up. darker colors get masked to reveal colors under it instead of adding new layers.

the clipping mask keeps a layer confined to the filled in spaces of the layer under it. right click on the layer and select "create clipping mask". you can add multiple layers in the mask, by either adding new ones or dragging them into it.

both of these things are good ways to let you experiment without damaging any layers. but I always end up duplicating layers out of habit and laziness. people probably know about these but I just learned about them recently :s

lxromero
lxromero profile pic Staff
2 designs submitted - Score now!

I use dark magic and sacrificial rituals mostly...

Evancooleo
lxromero said:

I use dark magic and sacrificial rituals mostly...

Maybe I should switch to dark magic... my elvin technique is getting iffy

Evancooleo

bump for justice

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