Close
One second...

ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR: What kind of shading/texture is this?

How do you make that kind of texture/shading in adobe illustrator?



Is there any tutorials available?
THANK YOU!

Watch this
jamesnotjim

im sure there will be on youtube :)

celandinestern

I'd do it in photoshop/ gimp rather than illustrator. Ilustrator does have some texture brushes but I've always found them super awkward. If you really want it to be vector you could make it in photoshop/ gimp and then import to illustrator and turn it into a halftone.

there used to be some great tutorials in the 'make' section but I can't find them now since the site overhauled a few days ago.

Wharton
1 design submitted - Score now!

I always draw the solid shapes and out the bulk of the drawing in illustrator and then take it into Photoshop for shading magic. The shading above looks like a splatter brush from photoshop.

melmike

You actually can do this in Illustrator using gradient meshes which then have a spatter filter applied to them. But yeah, brushes in Photoshop would probably be much faster and easier to control/edit.

jaywalkergraphics
melmike said:

You actually can do this in Illustrator using gradient meshes which then have a spatter filter applied to them. But yeah, brushes in Photoshop would probably be much faster and easier to control/edit.

I thought it looked like gradient meshes, too.

melmike

Once upon a time I did everything like this in meshes. It's how I did this:

They're great for smooth, even texturing, but kinda time-consuming.

ecsu

and the amount of time they would take to render would be annoying if you work on an outdated machine as i do. ):

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!

Thanks for all the help. Yeah I know you can do it in photoshop, but it looks so smooth in vector that why I wanted to know how to do it in vector. I don't like combining outline(vector) and effects/shading(raster)... It kinda looks awkward for me.

by the way guys, what is it called so I can search it in google or youtube.

nickv47
Wharton said:

I always draw the solid shapes and out the bulk of the drawing in illustrator and then take it into Photoshop for shading magic. The shading above looks like a splatter brush from photoshop.

this

gebe

If you are patient, you can do this in illustrator, working as an impressionist, with a brush and a tablet. If in hurry, you can use PS

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!
nickv47 said:
Wharton said:

I always draw the solid shapes and out the bulk of the drawing in illustrator and then take it into Photoshop for shading magic. The shading above looks like a splatter brush from photoshop.

this

The image I posted is pure vector, it was done by Musketon. But haven't got a reply from him yet. I wanted to know how to do it in vector

EricKaz
1 design submitted - Score now!

Good tips! Could probably be the gradient meshes like melmike showed, gonna try out that technique.

biotwist

the best trick is to just use photoshop

BubbleHezza

The time you will save in photoshop will leave you more time to drink beer.

Think smart

melmike
kaizenkris said:
nickv47 said:
Wharton said:

I always draw the solid shapes and out the bulk of the drawing in illustrator and then take it into Photoshop for shading magic. The shading above looks like a splatter brush from photoshop.

this

The image I posted is pure vector, it was done by Musketon. But haven't got a reply from him yet. I wanted to know how to do it in vector

I told you how to do it in illustrator, but the shading on the skull is not vector. When the the filter is applied onto a gradient mesh, the result is rasterized.

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!
melmike said:
kaizenkris said:
nickv47 said:
Wharton said:

I always draw the solid shapes and out the bulk of the drawing in illustrator and then take it into Photoshop for shading magic. The shading above looks like a splatter brush from photoshop.

this

The image I posted is pure vector, it was done by Musketon. But haven't got a reply from him yet. I wanted to know how to do it in vector

I told you how to do it in illustrator, but the shading on the skull is not vector. When the the filter is applied onto a gradient mesh, the result is rasterized.

Just tested it out... but the thing with spatter fill is, the only part that takes effect is the edges. and the texture/shading doesnt get bigger than the radius of 25.. Unlike the art work that I posted. Musketon posted that those effects where 100% vector... I think its a customized brush. I appreciate your help but I think it isn't just a spatter fill

melmike

Are you applying the filter to a gradient mask? You've got to fiddle with the gradients if you want a long, gradual spatter. Like I said, it's how I did the Mickey design above which looks very similar. And I don't mean to be argumentative, but while I understand he may have done the entire illustration in Illustrator, I'd be very surprised to learn that each one of those tiny uncountable dots are made up of anchor points. That would create a pointlessly chunky, unworkable file.

melmike

I should clarify, you'd probably have to do multiple little meshes to get the control you'd want, but I'm certain its manageable entirely in Illustrator.

melmike

I just did this in less than a minute in Illustrator using the gradient mesh / spatter effect process. I chose too light a colour, but the effect is pretty much identical.

jaywalkergraphics
melmike said:

I just did this in less than a minute in Illustrator using the gradient mesh / spatter effect process. I chose too light a colour, but the effect is pretty much identical.

Pardon me, sire, but thou art a beast of untold proportion.

melmike
jaywalkergraphics said:
melmike said:

I just did this in less than a minute in Illustrator using the gradient mesh / spatter effect process. I chose too light a colour, but the effect is pretty much identical.

Pardon me, sire, but thou art a beast of untold proportion.

hehe, why thank you, but in truth, if I appear to see further than others, it's only because I stand on the shoulders of giants.

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!
jaywalkergraphics said:
melmike said:

I just did this in less than a minute in Illustrator using the gradient mesh / spatter effect process. I chose too light a colour, but the effect is pretty much identical.

Pardon me, sire, but thou art a beast of untold proportion.

Yep Its Identical, but if you compare it. The image that you did is already a close-up view... But it appears that the dots are small on your artwork and not that crisp.. So when you zoom out on your image it will appear like its only a gradient.. (Like I've said before, that problem with spatter effect is you are allowed to use 25radius as maximum, so your dots won't get any bigger than that.)

Here's another artwork of Musketon.

Look how crisp that texture is.

melmike

I get what you're saying about the radius, but that's the great thing about working in vector, if the dots aren't big enough, just scale the artwork down to whatever size makes it work for you. As for the crispness, I just chose too light a shade, shoulda gone hard black to white. I still maintain that this can be done entirely in illustrator using this method, but yeah, if it were up to me, I'd probably still prefer just to use a custom speckle brush in Photoshop. Hope you can work out a method that works well for you.

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!

Alright thanks Mel! I'll be sure to share the technique If I figure it out or if he released a tutorial.

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

I suppose you could then live trace the shading... Crashing the hell out of AI trying to handle file size

Wharton
1 design submitted - Score now!

As an academic argument this is great. But honestly, just do it in Photoshop save yourself and your computer a headache.

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

Haha, for reals. I mean, vectors are great and all that but before you go through all that trouble you should first ask yourself WHY you really need it to be all in vectors.

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

I tried to use this technique a while ago in a project but it bogged down the computer so hard I just gave up and went with regular gradients.

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

The way I'd approach this would be to create the areas for the shading as solid shapes in AI and then import them to photoshop to be used as a mask for brushes like these. If you want you could then import that shading layer back to the illustrator file.

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!
Wharton said:

As an academic argument this is great. But honestly, just do it in Photoshop save yourself and your computer a headache.

because raster and vector are shit combination in my opinion. And that's what I wanted to know.. and yeah I know I could do it in photoshop... but I won't be able to do it as crisp as vectors.

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

But it IS a raster effect.

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!

It's not an argument on which is which. The artist who made those artwork said its pure vector, therefore I would believe the artist who made it. No opinion and no explanation, Im sorry but the question is simple. "How to do it in ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR" no justifying and stuff, just tired of these comments saying "Why do you want it in illustrator when you can do it in photoshop"... "Photoshop saves much time" etc etc. I already said I can do it in Photoshop, "BUT I WANNA KNOW HOW TO DO IT IN AI" Its that simple.. Over and out. LOL!

melmike

Okay, let's all take it down a notch.

We cool?

: )

I think I get why there's some tension brewing here. There's some miscommunication going on. The artist said, completely done in vector. Okay, I don't believe him, but I have to cop to it. It's what he said. But then you ask the question, "how do I do it in Illustrator?"

The answer is, you do it 100% in Illustrator, using raster effects.

Not everything done in Illustrator is vector. It can do both. It's awesome like that. Like the bi-sexual swinger of Adobe programs.

melmike

Okay, just saw you don't like combining vector and raster... in which case, the answer is....

dunno.

raymex

Looks like a texture to me, then converted to vector using live trace.

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!
melmike said:

Okay, let's all take it down a notch.

We cool?

: )

I think I get why there's some tension brewing here. There's some miscommunication going on. The artist said, completely done in vector. Okay, I don't believe him, but I have to cop to it. It's what he said. But then you ask the question, "how do I do it in Illustrator?"

The answer is, you do it 100% in Illustrator, using raster effects.

Not everything done in Illustrator is vector. It can do both. It's awesome like that. Like the bi-sexual swinger of Adobe programs.

Yeah were cool, not trying to start a beef, What I said isn't just for you. It's in general. Because there is just too many comments saying "just do it on photoshop" and shit like that.

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

Well pardon us for trying to help you and save you from some headaches. Didn't realize you were physically allergic to pixels!

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

I experimented a little with some AI tools and did this:

I know it's kind of crappy but just a proof of concept, sort of. I used the Symbol Sprayer tool to fill an area with a stipple symbol. At least in CS5 this symbol is in the Artistic Textures library. I then used some of the other symbol tools to try and push the symbols towards the bottom edge, rotating and resizing them. I duplicated the symbol set a couple of times to get the texture thicker, too. I then drew a shape on top of the pile of symbols, selected all and made a clipping mask.

This is all pure vector and it looks... okay. The symbols are not a precise thing to work with. But it's also seriously memory hogging. The tools started bogging down even with this one thing.

celandinestern

at the risk of being bitten, I'm just gonna say that if you're gonna print a thing like that on a tee, the crispness is gonna get lost anyway in the printing process. The only practical way in which I can imagine it making a difference whether it's raster or vector is if you want to print it on gigantic billboards (wait they usually have serious raster of their own) or if you want to present it as a zoomable image.

melmike

I set up art for billboards on occasion. The resolution is generally around 30dpi.

celandinestern
melmike said:

I set up art for billboards on occasion. The resolution is generally around 30dpi.

crispy :)))))

melmike

I know right, first time I heard that I was like, okaaaayyyy, hope I don't breaks photoshop.

kaizenkris
1 design submitted - Score now!

It's not for a tshirt btw. I just wanna know @Morki that looks good

Musk_eton

It's all vector. Maybe I should do a tutorial.

Morkki
1 design submitted - Score now!

Tutorials are always welcome!

melmike

Well, don't I feel like an asshole.

celandinestern
Musk_eton said:

It's all vector. Maybe I should do a tutorial.

a tut would be awesome!!!

No account?